French Celebrities, as Seen by Their Contemporaries; Marshal de Macmahon by Ernest Daudet. Leon Gambetta by H Ector Depasse. Jules Grevy by Lucien del

French Celebrities, as Seen by Their Contemporaries; Marshal de Macmahon by Ernest Daudet. Leon Gambetta by H Ector Depasse. Jules Grevy by Lucien del

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1883 edition. Excerpt: ...at Rennes. After remaining at the Normal School for some time, he was received as Fellow in Philosophy at Caen and at Versailles. At the latter place he achieved a brilliant success. Victor Cousin, whose earnest disciple he was, called him to Paris, and secured for him a charge at the Normal School of that city. For a time he was supplementary lecturer on the History of Philosophy, and a year later he became the principal lecturer. In 1848 he entered the Constituent Assembly, which, early in 1849, elected him to the Council of State; but not being confirmed by the Legislative Assembly, he retired in 1850. Following the coup d'etat, M. Simon's course of lectures at the Sorbonne was suspended, and, as he refused to take the oath of allegiance to the Empire, it was assumed that he had resigned his professorship. In 1863, he was elected to the Corps Legislatif, and soon became the recognized leader of the Republican group. He advocated popular education, free trade, the abolition of capital punishment, and the interest of the working classes; and in 1870 he opposed the Plebiscite in favor of Louis Napoleon, and the proclamation of war against Prussia. On the establishment of the Government of National Defence, he became Minister of Education, Religion, and Fine Arts, and instituted many reforms, the most prominent of which was the obligatory school law. On February 19th, 1871, he became Minister of Education and Religion, under the Thiers Government, from which he retired on the overthrow of the 24th of May. He retained his seat in the National Assembly, however, and, in 1875, received from the government a pension of 6000 francs. In December of the same year he was named a Life Senator, and on the very same day was elected a member of the French...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 52 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 109g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236510348
  • 9781236510341