FreeHand Perspective and Sketching; Principles and Methods of Expression in the Pictorial Representation of Common Objects, Interiors, Buildings, and

FreeHand Perspective and Sketching; Principles and Methods of Expression in the Pictorial Representation of Common Objects, Interiors, Buildings, and

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1908 edition. Excerpt: ...by its diagonals, and make the near half of the door a little wider than the far one. Check this by seeing that the remaining distances (from the door to the front corners of the house) are also perspectively equal, that is, the near one larger. Mark the sides of the windows in the same way. Remember that since the space between the near window and the near corner is considerably nearer to us than that between the far window and the far corner, more difference should be made in their size than between the halves of the door. The width of the windows on the end of the house should be to that of the front ones as the right face of the second cube in Chapter XVII (Fig. 84) is to the right one. The height of the windows in the "L" is made the same perspectively by carrying their measurements from the right front corner of the main house on lines vanishing to VP1. These lines lie on the invisible end of the main house, and from where they reach the "L" are continued along its front by lines running to VP2. The Chimney.--To better visualize this part of the house, cut and fold cardboard as in Fig. 121. G.et the slope of lines 1, 2, 3, and 4 by laying the cardboard against the apex of the gable and marking around it. Stand this model on the roof in its middle, and after marking on the roof around it, cut out the space so marked and push the chimney down through the open Fig. 121 ing until it projects the proper distance above the roof. Lay a pencil on the roof against the chimney (Fig. 122), and move it to the left without changing its direction till it coincides with the gable edge. This shows the gable edge and the oblique line where the chimney passes through the roof to be actually parallel. This oblique line, therefore, has the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 34 pages
  • 188.98 x 246.13 x 1.78mm | 81.65g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236491653
  • 9781236491657