France, Her Governmental, Administrative, and Social Organisation; Exposed and Considered, in Its Principles, in Its Working, and in Its Results

France, Her Governmental, Administrative, and Social Organisation; Exposed and Considered, in Its Principles, in Its Working, and in Its Results

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1844 edition. Excerpt: ...their rivals, of restraining factions, of crushing demagogues, of annually saving the state, and, in short, of becoming great men. This is the principal, the constant object, the grand ceuvre of a French ministry, since the Revolution of July; and they accomplish it by means of a simple but certain majority. To secure that majority is, then, the only thing absolutely necessary. Two hundred and thirty members form the absolute majority of the deputies; they must have a few more. Two hundred and sixty would be enough in the minister's opinion; but the opinion of the court is in favour of 300. The total number of electors, in 350 poor electoral arrondissements, is, at the utmost, 100,000. Sixty thousand places, granted to as many electors of those arrondissements, give to the minister of the day a majority of 20,000 votes in the colleges; and he obtains this object at a sacrifice of only one quarter of the good things at his disposal. The large towns, the industrial and enlightened departments, can vote as they please; it is a matter of perfect indifference. Such is the electoral science, as professed and openly practised by the doctrinaires! There is no difficulty in anticipating the results with regard to the councils of arrondissements and of departments, as well as with regard to the chamber of deputies, when the minister of the interior, the grand elector of France, has nothing else to do, in order to secure success, but to send a circular to the prefects and the sub-prefects, threatening a dismissal, not of themselves only, but also of their subordinate agents in all the branches of the public administration, if the ministerial candidates are defeated in the electoral colleges. Let us now successively examine the organization of the councils, ..show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 74 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 150g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236549341
  • 9781236549341