Fragments of Revolutionary History; Being Hitherto Unpublished Writings of the Men of the American Revolution, Collected and Edited, Under Authority of the District of Columbia Society, Sons of the Revolution

Fragments of Revolutionary History; Being Hitherto Unpublished Writings of the Men of the American Revolution, Collected and Edited, Under Authority of the District of Columbia Society, Sons of the Revolution

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1892 edition. Excerpt: ...Mr. Graham, but the feeling, which it excited, has in truth been the cause of the delay. So many interesting circumstances have occurred between us, to which we have been parties, and others of which we have been spectators, in both countries, since the battle of Brandywine, that I never can review them without peculiar interest and sensibility. The letter referred to, brought them to my recollection with great force. But, my dear friend, I can never take anything from you, nor from your family. I have known and seen too much of your and their sufferings, to commit such an outrage to my feelings. Your claims are too strong on me personally, on my country, and the friends of liberty everywhere, for me to do it. I sent your letFrom State Dept. MSS., Monroe papers. ter to Mr. Graham, with instruction not to think of the measure, or rather to take no step in execution of it, and with which he has complied. If I was ever to visit France, your house would be my home, but we are both too far advanced in years to think of such a voyage. We must content ourselves with writing to each other, which I shall do hereafter, more frequently. With my ill state of health, and the accident from which it proceeded in the first instance, you have been acquainted. I have suffered much thro' the winter, but am now so far recovered, as to be able to take my usual exercise on horseback, and which I do daily, when the weather will permit. The legislature of this state have called a convention, to be held in October next, to amend the Constitution. It was the first framed in the Union, and has managed affairs successfully; but it is generally admitted to have defects, which require amendment. Mr. Madison has been invited by his district to become a member, and to which he...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 44 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 95g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123662212X
  • 9781236622129