Four Years with General Lee; Being a Summary of the More Important Events Touching the Career of General Robert E. Lee, in the War Between the States Together with an Authoritative Statement of the Strength of the Army Which He Commanded

Four Years with General Lee; Being a Summary of the More Important Events Touching the Career of General Robert E. Lee, in the War Between the States Together with an Authoritative Statement of the Strength of the Army Which He Commanded

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1878 edition. Excerpt: ...to the extent of General Buford's cavalry command. General Lee witnessed the flight of the Federals through Gettysburg and up the hills beyond. He then directed me to go to General Ewell and to say to him that, from the position which he occupied, he could see the enemy retreating over those hills, without organization and in great confusion, that it was only necessary to press " those people" in order to secure possession of the heights, and that, if possible, he wished him to do this. In obedience to these instructions, I proceeded immediately to General Ewell and delivered the order of General Lee; and, after receiving from him some message for the commanding general in regard to the prisoners captured, returned to the latter and reported that his order had been delivered. General Ewell did not express any objection, or indicate the existence of any impediment, to the execution of the order conveyed to him, but left the impression upon my mind that it would be executed. In the exercise of that discre-J tion, however, which General Lee was accustomed to accord to his lieutenants, ' and probably because of an undue regard for his admonition, given early in the day, not to precipitate a general engagement, General Ewell deemed it unwise to make the pursuit. The troops were not moved forward, and the enemy proceeded to occupy and fortify the po when General Lee started on this campaign, reduced at this date to about five thousand five hundred, as will be shown later in this narrative; making the total engaged in the action of the first day twenty-two thousand. It could not have exceeded twenty-four thousand. General Butterfield, chief of staff of the Army of the Potomac, testified before the Committee on the Conduct of the War...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 60 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 127g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236975952
  • 9781236975959