Four Chapters of Paterson History; I. the War for Independence. II. the Early White Settlers. III. Struggle for Industrial Supremacy. IV. Municipal Administration

Four Chapters of Paterson History; I. the War for Independence. II. the Early White Settlers. III. Struggle for Industrial Supremacy. IV. Municipal Administration

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1919 edition. Excerpt: ...help him if he were to call the new town after the governor; When the New Jersey lawmakers took the matter up they were glad to-oblige the great Secretary of the Treasury of the United States and the governor of the state of New Jersey and so Hamilton got all he wanted. Before the law was passed there was a great deal of talk among the lawmakers. It was settled that the new' town of Paterson with its big factories and its own govern"ment was to be placed somewhere in New Jersey, but just where the law did not say. Every member of the legislature wanted it in his own county. Lawmakers who saw that chances of getting the town in the county they represented were poor made a fight against it. The people in-1 Middlesex county saw that their chances were poor and so they did not want any other county to win. They-thought that a million dollars was too much money for any company to have, and the law provided that the Society might have. just that much. But the funniest objection came from a man who thought that it was wrong to give the Society the right to build canals; he said that some lunatic might think it would be fine if a canal were built from the Delaware river to Raritan bay and that, if that were done, many farms would be cut into two pieces so that farmers could not get from one part to the other; it would kill all the fruit trees and make everybody poor along the line of the canal. Forty years afterwards that very canal was built, not by the Society, but by other men, but none of the horrible things happened which the man from Middlesex county had seen in the future. After a great deal of talk the lawmakers voted and the result was that Hamilton won and the law, or charter, was passed, on November 22, 1791. NAMING THE...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 28 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 68g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236934601
  • 9781236934604