The Forestal Conditions and Silvicultural Prospects of the Coastal Plain of New Jersey; With Remarks in Reference to Other Regions and Kindred Subjects

The Forestal Conditions and Silvicultural Prospects of the Coastal Plain of New Jersey; With Remarks in Reference to Other Regions and Kindred Subjects

By (author) 

List price: US$12.10

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1900 edition. Excerpt: ...the remotest corners of this land, if not this continent. There is nothing surprising in the fact that a man in New Jersey may use in the construction of his house white-pine from the far North, cypress and yellow-pine from the far South and redwood shingles from the far West, and buy it all from the stock of one lumber dealer in Philadelphia or New York.. I Besides the development of the saw-mill industry in Southern Jersey, when the woods are properly protectedand managed there will arise, no doubt, many other industries, such as box, stave and market-basket manufacture. I It is, of course, impossible to predict the many industries which may be operated in a country where such a useful material as even the poorest grade of wood is produced. In the Spessart, in Germany, for instance, years ago immense quantities of beech were planted, to supply the glass factories with fuel. The glass works have ceased to exist and the beech is subjected to a process of dry distillation which yields several valuable products. Hardwoods, by this process, will yield charcoal, pyroligneous acid, an inflammable gas which may be used for illuminating purposes, besides other products. Some day we may export charcoal to the tropical regions of the globe, where it is the most satisfactory fuel because it emits no smoke, and braziers can be used instead of stoves. ' Then there is the possibility, of producing wood for pulp and cellulose. Spruce is the principal source of supply at present, but even if spruce cannot be produced successfully in South Jersey, which is, however, a question, there are other trees which are and no doubt many which may be used for that purpose. In fact it would be impossible to predict the future of this industry, which, although...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 36 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 82g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236974425
  • 9781236974426