A Foreigner's Opinion of England, Englishmen, English Women, English Manners, English Morals; And a Variety of Other Interesting Subjects, Including Memorials of Nature and Art, Comprised in a Series of Free Remarks, the Result Volume 2

A Foreigner's Opinion of England, Englishmen, English Women, English Manners, English Morals; And a Variety of Other Interesting Subjects, Including Memorials of Nature and Art, Comprised in a Series of Free Remarks, the Result Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1821 edition. Excerpt: ...inventions: would it not fill our minds with the most gloomy forebodings of universal devastation. It is therefore a most dangerous heresy, when enlightened Englishmen, during a perilous crisis, confide in the patriotism of the populace. Yet even this strange delusion does not appear so unwarrantable, as the absurd belief, which many Englishmen profess conceming their good-nature; a trait of character, from their savage and inhuman disposition, absolutely incomprehensible. I am strongly inclined to assert indeed, from what I have seen and heard of them during my stay in England, that they not only emulate, but surpass the Parisian populace in wild and ferocious manners. A bare comparison of the commissions of delinquency at Paris with those countless cases of robberies and murders, with which the English journals abound, seems sufficient to corroborate this assertion. But when we reflect farther, that in the present defective state of the criminal Judicature, mous, ofiences are brought to light, we may rationally conclude that, with the exception of Ireland, there is no country in Europe where the morals of the rabble are so vicious as in England. It would indeed be a tremendous picture, if any one conversant in human nature were to undertake the task of collecting and combining those prominent features which genuinely characterise the London mob. Opportunities for such observations are not wanting. On no amphitheatre does the populace exhibit such a public character, or find such frequent occasions for assuming a variety of shapes. The grand sphere of it's active exertions, where it makes the most conspicuous figure, and has acquired a visible ascendency, is at the bloody spectacle of Newgate. Here they welcome the champion of the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 40 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 91g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236825381
  • 9781236825384