A Foreign View of England in the Reigns of George I and George II; The Letters of Monsieur Cesar de Saussure to His Family; Translated and Edited by Madame Van Muyden

A Foreign View of England in the Reigns of George I and George II; The Letters of Monsieur Cesar de Saussure to His Family; Translated and Edited by Madame Van Muyden

By (author) 

List price: US$9.37

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1902 edition. Excerpt: ... OF GENEROSITY 181 fighting in this same manner. The insolence of the populace is so great that as soon as an honest man has any disagreement with one of their kind, he is at once invited to strip and fight. It would be dangerous to retaliate with a cane or sword; the lookers-on would at once be against him, and things might end badly for him. Noblemen of rank, almost beside themselves with anger at the arrogance of a carter or person of that sort, have been seen to throw off their coats, wigs, and swords, in order to use their fists. This sort of adventure often befell the Duke of Leeds, and he even made it into an amusement. My Lord Herbert, who is a very strong and robust man, recently fought a porter, and punished him well; the man was so surprised that he exclaimed, "D sure you are the son of a porter, not of a lord; you know how to use your fists too well." Englishmen are generally generous and grateful for services rendered. I will relate an instance of this which has struck me. Monsieur de la Harpe, from Rolle, in Switzerland, of whom undoubtedly you have heard, was travelling in Italy with my Lord Boston, the Earl of Grantham's eldest son. In some small town--I do not remember which--he met an Englishman, who appeared to be in great straits of poverty, and who appealed to him for help, saying he was a gentleman by birth, and that he had been robbed in his travels, and had no money to continue his journey. He was, in fact, in a miserable situation. There was no means of discovering whether this man spoke the truth or not. However, Monsieur de la Harpe offered him a sufficient sum of money to enable him to travel to Milan, and there await a letter of credit from England. This young man was in reality what he had...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 72 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 145g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • Illustrations, black and white
  • 1236745493
  • 9781236745491