Food; Control and Distribution of Food Supplies. Hearings Sixty-Fifth Congress, First Session Relative to S. 2463 Volume 1

Food; Control and Distribution of Food Supplies. Hearings Sixty-Fifth Congress, First Session Relative to S. 2463 Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1917 edition. Excerpt: ...price, and further provides that in case imports come in at a price so low as to threaten the minimum price so fixed the President can fix an import duty on such imports. Do you think that necessary, Mr. Hoover? Mr. Hoover. I assume that provision has been worked out with a view to protecting the Government against financial loss. The Chairman. That is undoubtedly true, and to raise the price of necessaries that are coming in too cheap, to lessen their supply. Mr. Hoover. Yes, sir. The Chairman. The reason I asked that is to lay a basis for a further question in regard to section 4. Section 1"2 authorizes the imposition of this duty in order to lessen the supply and to protect the price. Section 4 makes it a crime for anybody to limit or lessen the production. The President is empowered to levy a tax in ocder to limit the supply and keep the price up. but by section 4 it is made an offense for any individual to limit or lessen production. Do you not think there is a little inconsistency in that? Mr. Hoover. It strikes me that without that you are going to drive the Government into a loss on guaranties under certain contingencies. The Chairman. I understand that perfectly well. It is to prevent the price going down, which would, of course, prevent people from getting things cheap; but the point is to protect the Government in guaranteeing the price. But if the Government has the power to limit supplies, why should it be made a crime for any farmer to produce less one year than he did the year before, because the price did not suit him? Senator Kenyon. Is there any penalty provided? The Chairman. Section 17 contains a general penal clause which would relate to it in a way. Senator Ken Yon. I would like to ask Mr. Hoover why there is no penalty...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 34 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 82g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236665317
  • 9781236665317