The Flowers of Persian Literature; Extracts in Prose and Verse, with a Transl. to Which Is Prefixed an Essay on the Language and Literature of Persia.

The Flowers of Persian Literature; Extracts in Prose and Verse, with a Transl. to Which Is Prefixed an Essay on the Language and Literature of Persia.

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1805 edition. Excerpt: ...not, I am persuaded, suspect my testimony, or think that I go too sar, when I assure you, that I will assert nothing positively, which I am not able satissactorily to demonstrate. When Mohammed was born, and Anufhiravan, wjiom he calls the just King, sat on the throne of Persia, two languages appear to have been generally prevalent in the great empire of Iran; that of the Court, thence named Deri, which was only a resined and elegant dialect of the Parsi, so called from the province, of which Shfraz is now the capital, and that of the learned, in which most books were composed, and which had the name.ofPahlavi, either from the heroes, who spoke it informer times, or from Pahlu, a tract of land, which included, we are told, some considerable cities of Ir&k: the ruder dialects of both were, and, I believe, still are, spoken by the rusticks in several provinces; and in many of them, as Herat, Zabul, Sistan, and others, distinct idioms were vernacular, as it happens in every kingdom of great extent. Besides the Pars! and Pahlavi, a very ancient and abstruse tongue was known to the priests and philosophers, called " the language of the Zend," because a book on religious and moral duties, which they held sacred, and which bore that name, had been written in it; while the Pazend, or comment on that work, was composed in Pahlavi, as a more popular idiom; but a learned follower of Zeratusht, named This work, we arc happy to sind, has been reprinted iu London in six volumes, 4to, and. likewise in 8vo' Bahman, Bahman, who lately died at Caleutta, where he had lived with me as a Persian reader about three years, assured me, that the letters of his prophet's book were properly called Zend, and the language, A vesta, as the words of the Vedas, ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 44 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 95g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236637895
  • 9781236637895