Florence in the Poetry of the Brownings; Being a Selection of the Poems of Robert and Elizabeth Barrett Browning Which Have to Do with the History the Scenery and the Art of Florence

Florence in the Poetry of the Brownings; Being a Selection of the Poems of Robert and Elizabeth Barrett Browning Which Have to Do with the History the Scenery and the Art of Florence

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1904 edition. Excerpt: ...uses of labor are surely done; There remaineth a rest for the people of God: And I have had troubles enough, for-one. "the somewhat petty, ' /! Of finical touch and tempera cpifrMg)--(.... A leant BaldovinettV--Old Pictures in Florence, p. 114 XXIII But at any rate I have loved the season Of Art's spring-birth so dim and dewy; My sculptor is Nicolo, the Pisan, My painter--who but Cimabue? Nor ever was man of them all indeed, From these to Ghiberti and Ghirlandajo, Could say that he missed my critic-meed. So, now to my special grievance--heigh ho! XXIV Their ghosts still stand, as I said before, Watching each fresco flaked and rasped, Blocked up, knocked out, or whitewashed o'er: --No getting again what the church has grasped! The works on the wall must take their chance; "Works never conceded to England's thick clime!" (I hope they prefer their inheritance Of a bucketful of Italian quick-lime.) XXV When they go at length, with such a shaking Of heads o'er the old delusion, sadly Each master his way through the black streets taking, Where many a lost work breathes though badly--Why don't they bethink them of who has merited? Why not reveal, while their pictures dree Such doom, how a captive might be out-ferreted? Why is it they never remember me? XXVI Not that I expect the great Bigordi, Nor Sandro to hear me, chivalric, bellicose; Nor the wronged Lippino; and not a word I Say of a scrap of Fra Angelico's: But are you too fine, Taddeo Gaddi, To grant me a taste of your intonaco, Some Jerome that seeks the heaven with a sad eye? Not a churlish saint, Lorenzo Monaco? XXVII1 Could not the ghost with the close red cap, My Pollajolo, the twice a craftsman, Save me a sample, give me the hap Of a muscular Christ that shows the draughtsman?...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 54 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 113g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123663070X
  • 9781236630704