First Part of King Henry VI, by Shakespeare (?) Second Part of King Henry VI, by Shakespeare (?) Third Part of King Henry VI, by Shakespeare (?) King Edward IV, by Heywood. King Richard III, by Shakespeare. Perkin Warbeck, by Ford. King

First Part of King Henry VI, by Shakespeare (?) Second Part of King Henry VI, by Shakespeare (?) Third Part of King Henry VI, by Shakespeare (?) King Edward IV, by Heywood. King Richard III, by Shakespeare. Perkin Warbeck, by Ford. King

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1896 edition. Excerpt: ...But seat you in the throne imperial, Which now another basely doth usurp. K. Ed. I thank his honour for his good regard. Pleaseth you stay, till we have paus'd upon it, And you shall have our answer to the Duke. Tom Sellinger, receive him to your tent, And let him taste a cup of Orleans wine. Exeunt CONTE and SELLINGER. Now, kingly brother, have you heard this news? K. Lew.. So plainly, my lord, that I scarce held myself From stepping forth, hearing my royal name So much profan'd and slubber'd as it was; But I do weigh the person like himself, From whence it came--a sly dissembler; And, spite my anger, I was forc'd sometime To smile, to think the Duke doth hang his friend, Behind his back, whom to his face he smoothes. K. Ed. But we shall have far better sport anon. Howard tells me that another messenger Is come in post haste from the Constable; As you have begun, with patience hear the rest. K. Lew. No more ado. I'll to my place again. Remember that you still be deaf, my lord. K. Ed. I warrant you. Call in the messenger. Enter the Messenger from the Constable. Illess. To the victorious King of England, Health! K. Ed. Tell him he must strain out his voice aloud; For I am somewhat deaf, and cannot hear. How. His majesty requests you to speak out, Because his hearing is of late decayed. Mess. The worthy Earl St. Paul K. Ed. Come nearer me. Mess. The worthy Earl St. Paul greets noble Edward, And gives your grace to understand by me, That whereas Charles, that painted sepulchre, And most disloyal Duke of Burgundy, Hath but usurp'd the habit of a friend, Being in heart your deadly enemy, As well appears in his false breach of promise, And that whereas he never meant himself To send you aid, but likewise was...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 156 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 8mm | 290g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236778219
  • 9781236778215