First Mohonk Conference on the Negro Question; Held at Lake Mohonk, Ulster County, New York, June 4, 5, 6, 1890

First Mohonk Conference on the Negro Question; Held at Lake Mohonk, Ulster County, New York, June 4, 5, 6, 1890

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1890 edition. Excerpt: ... Ransom, Riddleberger, Gibson, Lamar, Vance, Berry, Blackburn, Eustis, Jones, of Alabama; Mahone, Walthall, Daniel, and Pasco. And among the historic facts cited by him in favor of national aid as the ancient, beneficial, and established policy of the government, were some in regard to which the American people have been systematically deluded and deceived, by ingenious attempts to prove that a bill for national aid would be a bill to promote mendicancy. He showed that "Aid rightly bestowed, instead of promoting mendicancy, will develop self exertion, self-reliance, self-maintenance of popular education, and prevent any relaxation of efforts in behalf of the independent maintenance of school systems. From the ordinance of 1787, prior to the adoption of the Constitution, through every administration, by every party, by every statesman, down to the present period, national encouragement of education in some form has been approved and sustained. Up to 1880, the Southern States had received for school purposes 5,520,504 acres of public land; for universities, 322,560 acres; and for agricultural and mechanical colleges, 3,270,000 acres. During the same period, the Northern States and Territories received for schools 62,273,415 acres; for universities, 842,960 acres; and for agricultural and mechanical colleges, 6,330,000 acres. The enabling act of 22d of February, 1889, enlarged these land grants by gifts to the Dakotas, Montana, and Washington." In the face of these historic facts, showing national aid to State education to be the settled policy of the government, it was said of the bill introduced and so ably sustained by Senator Blair, that it was the bill of a crank; that nobody else had any special interest in it; that it had no...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 74 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 150g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236551397
  • 9781236551399