A Financial Centre for Two Empires

A Financial Centre for Two Empires : Hong Kong's Corporate, Securities and Tax Laws in its Transition from Britain to China

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Description

This is a case study of legal transplant, economic development, cultural adaptation and political integration. Hong Kong's journey from British entrepot to China's international financial centre is one of the most interesting legal stories of our time. But Hong Kong's future is even more interesting: will this region with British-origin institutions survive full integration into China and become its permanent international financial centre? Does Hong Kong have the legal infrastructure to compete effectively with Shanghai and Singapore, and even New York and London? A Financial Centre for Two Empires presents Hong Kong's story, examines its corporate economy and securities market, assesses its corporate, securities and tax laws for doctrinal soundness and appropriate remedies, and evaluates the quality of their enforcement empirically. It closes with a view of Hong Kong from the perspective of developments in Beijing and Shanghai, including an examination of the important political dimension.show more

Product details

  • Electronic book text
  • CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS
  • Cambridge University Press (Virtual Publishing)
  • Cambridge, United Kingdom
  • 27 b/w illus.
  • 1139950061
  • 9781139950060

About David C. Donald

David C. Donald is a professor in the Faculty of Law at The Chinese University of Hong Kong. Jiangyu Wang is a professor in the Faculty of Law at the National University of Singapore. Jefferson VanderWolk is a member of Ernst and Young's Washington Council, Ernst and Young practice.show more

Table of contents

1. History's marks on Hong Kong law: from British colony to Chinese SAR; 2. Hong Kong's economic structure: the corporate control context; 3. Hong Kong corporate and securities laws in response to the region's role as China's international financial centre; 4. The role of Hong Kong's tax policies; 5. Enforcement of corporate and securities law in Hong Kong; 6. China's impact on Hong Kong's position as an international financial centre: the legal and policy dimensions.show more