Final Report of William Wallace Brown, Assistant Attorney-General; Being a Condensed Statement of the Work Done, the Questions Considered, and the Most Important Decisions Rendered

Final Report of William Wallace Brown, Assistant Attorney-General; Being a Condensed Statement of the Work Done, the Questions Considered, and the Most Important Decisions Rendered : With a Schedule of the Claims Filed, the Disposition of

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1910 edition. Excerpt: ...to the support of the Government, and, in turn, he may hold federal ofiices, vote at elections for federal officers, and he maycall upon the United States Government to protect him in his person and property against the wrongful acts of or in foreign countries. The distinction is plain and clear and is no longer a matter of contention. (Slaughter-House Cases, 16 VVall., 36; United States v. Cruikshank, 92 U. S., 542.) III. CITIZENSHIP IN THE INTERNATIONAL SENSE. There are but three ways in which citizenship of the United States may be obtained: (1) By birth in the United States or to a citizen father; (2) by naturalization; and (3) by treaty. The latter will receive no consideration in this brief. 1. By birth.-----It is generally stated that all ersons born in the United States are citizens of the United States, ut this is not a correct statement. The clause of the fourteenth amendment on this subject reads thus: All persons born or naturalized in the United States and subject to the jurisdiction thereof are citizens of the United States and of the State in which they reside. The recise meaning of the phrase "and subject to the jurisdiction thereo " has not been fully determined, though it has been the subject of consideration on different occasions. The Constitution has not defined its meaning, and it must be inter reted "in the light of the common law, the principles and history o which were familiarly known to the framers of the Constitution." (United States v. Wong Kim Ark, 169 U. S., 649, 654.) In the same case, on page 676, the court says: As appears upon the face of the amendment, as well as from the history of the times, this was not intended to impose any new restrictions upon citizenship, or to prevent...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 96 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 186g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236957903
  • 9781236957900