Fielding's Novels. Cowper and Rousseau. the First Edinburgh Reviewers. Wordsworth's Ethics. Landor's Imaginary Conversations. Macaulay. Charlotte Bronte. Charles Kingsley. Godwin and Shelley

Fielding's Novels. Cowper and Rousseau. the First Edinburgh Reviewers. Wordsworth's Ethics. Landor's Imaginary Conversations. Macaulay. Charlotte Bronte. Charles Kingsley. Godwin and Shelley

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1904 edition. Excerpt: ...as an excuse for rambling, instead of so skilfully subordinating them to the main purpose as to reproduce new variations on the central theme, he is clearly in error, or is at least aiming at a lower kind of excellence. And this, it may be said at once, seems to be the most radical defect in point of composition of Landor's Conversa tions. They have the fault which his real talk is said to have exemplified. We are told that his temperament "disqualified him for anything like sustained reasoning, and he instinctively backed away from discussion or argument." Many of the written dialogues are a prolonged series of explosions; when one expects a continuous development of a theme, they are monotonous thundergrowls. Landor undoubtedly had a sufficient share of dramatic power to write short dialogues expressing a single situation with most admirable power, delicacy, and firmness of touch. Nor, again, does the criticism just made refer to those longer dialogues which are in reality a mere string of notes upon poems or proposals for reforms in spelling. The slight dramatic form binds together his pencillings from the margins of Paradise Lost or Wordsworth's poems very pleasantly, and enables him to give additional effect to vivacious outbursts of praise or censure. But the more elaborate dialogues suffer grievously from this absence of a true unity. There is not that skilful evolution of a central idea without the rigid formality of scientific discussion which we admire in the real masterpieces of the art. We have a conglomerate, not an organic growth; a series of observations set forth with never-failing elegance of style, and often with singular keenness of per ception; but they do not take us beyond the starting-point....show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 88 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 172g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236939697
  • 9781236939692