The Fertility of the Land; A Summary Sketch of the Relationship of Farm-Practice to the Maintaining and Increasing of the Productivity of the Soil

The Fertility of the Land; A Summary Sketch of the Relationship of Farm-Practice to the Maintaining and Increasing of the Productivity of the Soil

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1898 edition. Excerpt: ...It is one thing to have the means at hand for securing a full supply of nitrogen, and quite another to know how to wisely use them; or, in other words, how most wisely to make use of plant, animal and soil to secure this high-priced and necessary element. Plants are unable to live on the product of preceding plants until the organized matter of these preceding plants has been broken down and resolved into original compounds. Scientific farming may be said to consist in part in filling the soil with cheap and refuse potential plant-food, and in taking it out of the soil as finished products so skilfully that the supply is kept equal to the demand, and this with profit to the farmer and benefit to the land. It is one thing to put potential plant-food into the soil, and quite another to get it out profitably. There are various means used to secure the desired results, amongst which tillage has been already mentioned, but dependence should not be placed on this alone. The relation of lime to nitrification demands a word at this point. While lime has been used to some extent for many centuries to furnish plant-food indirectly, and while many investigations have been conducted to discover the complex action of lime when applied to the land, and while something is positively known as to its action, so many contradictory results are reached that the farmer is impelled to test its action not only on his own farm, but on every field of it, in order to arrive at facts which are applicable to his own conditions; and this is not strange, for the soil is not one uniform mass, but is naturally extremely variable. Most of the earthy parts of the soil have been transported long distances by the action of ice and water, sifted, sorted and deposited under such a...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 108 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 209g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236599616
  • 9781236599612