The Ferns of North America; Colored Figures and Descriptions, with Synonymy and Geographical Distribution, of the Ferns (Including the Ophioglossace ) of the United States of America and the British North American Posessions Volume 1

The Ferns of North America; Colored Figures and Descriptions, with Synonymy and Geographical Distribution, of the Ferns (Including the Ophioglossace ) of the United States of America and the British North American Posessions Volume 1

By (author) 

List price: US$5.60

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1893 edition. Excerpt: ...through the middle of every lobe. The frond is smooth throughout, and, excepting the veins, is composed of a single layer of slightly elongated hexagonal cells, the middle of each cell vacant and transparent, the chlorophyl consisting of minute grains lining the-cell-wall.' The fruit, when it is present, is formed at the ends of the lower lobes of the divisions or segments of the pinnae, and consists of little funnel-shaped cups, narrowly wing-margined, and having an obscurely two-lipped orifice. From the bottom of this cup there rises a slender dark-colored bristle-like receptacle or columella, on the sides of which, inside the cup, 'are borne the top-shaped sporangia. These have a nearly horizontal complete elastic ring. The spores are ovoid and obscurely papillose. A careful description of the mode of' growth of this most interesting fern was written by Professor John Hussey, and published by Mr. Williamson in his "Ferns of Kentucky." Another account, by the same close observer, was published in "The Independent" of Feb. 25, 1875: "I discovered it growing in more than a dozen localities under the Green River-Country cliffs. It was found in every instance on the under side of an overhanging rock, generally considerably withdrawn from the light, never reached by the direct rays of the sun. It does best on a moist ' See the elaborate monograph on the structure of Hyme1zopkyllacew by Dr. Mettenius, 'wherein the various forms of cells and dispositions of chlorophyl are described and figured. rock, where it is bedewed by spray from falling water, or where the clear water trickling from hidden springs keeps the fronds constantly moist, and where the fine drops hang trembling on the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 78 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 154g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236860128
  • 9781236860125