Female Entrepreneurs in Nineteenth-Century Russia

Female Entrepreneurs in Nineteenth-Century Russia

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Description

This pioneering work comprehensively examines the history of female entrepreneurship in the Russian Empire during nineteenth-century industrial development.
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Product details

  • Hardback | 272 pages
  • 159 x 235 x 16mm | 522g
  • Pickering & Chatto (Publishers) Ltd
  • London, United Kingdom
  • English
  • 1851969675
  • 9781851969678

Table of contents

Introduction 1 Female Entrepreneurship in the 1800s--20s: Business and the Issue of Property 2 Female Entrepreneurship in the 1830s-40s: a Hidden Success 3 Female Entrepreneurship in the 1850s-60s: an Unstable Rise 4 Female Entrepreneurship in the 1870s: Family levers in Business Regulation 5 Female Entrepreneurship in the 1880s: the Dictate of Money Inside the Family Circle 6 Female Entrepreneurship in the 1890s: a Breakthrough Towards Independence Conclusion
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Review quote

'a serious analysis of the development of entrepreneurship' Russian Review 'Ulianova has contributed an altogether new and enlightening chapter to the history of Russian women ... we are much in her debt for this valuable compendium of statistical material and, even more, for her often fascinating sketches of the lives, loves, conflicts, and successes of imperial Russia's businesswomen.' American Historical Review 'Ulianova offers a well documented narrative, which offers both information and analyses for business and gender studies and for the history of Russia in area studies.' Business History Review 'The great strength of Ulianova's book lies in the careful and detailed archival work she has undertaken that has allowed her to identify and analyse the careers of the women who managed Russian businesses.' English Historical Review 'a very detailed and interesting study' Women's History Review 'Ulianova's account makes a significant contribution to our understanding of not only female ownership but also of the changing composition of enterprises in Russia over the nineteenth century and of the mechanisms for the acquisition, transfer and sale of property.' European History Quarterly
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