The Federalist; A Commentary on the Constitution of the United States, Being a Collection of Essays Written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison and John Jay in Support of the Constitution Agreed Upon September 17, 1787 by the Volume 8

The Federalist; A Commentary on the Constitution of the United States, Being a Collection of Essays Written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison and John Jay in Support of the Constitution Agreed Upon September 17, 1787 by the Volume 8

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1901 edition. Excerpt: ...there are two parts (not indeed separable with microscopic accuracy, for the genius of great affairs abhors nicety of division): first, those which excite and preserve the reverence of the population--the Dignified parts, if I may so call them; and next, the Efficient parts--those by which it in fact, works and rules. There are two great objects which every constitution must attain to be successful, which every old and celebrated one must have wonderfully achieved: every constitution must first Gain authority, and then Use authority; it must first win the loyalty and confidence of mankind, and then employ that homage in the work of government. There are indeed practical men who reject the dignified parts of government. They say, we want only to attain results, to do business: a constitution is a collection of political means for political ends, and if you admit that any part of a constitution does no business, or that a simpler machine would do equally well what it does, you admit that this part of the constitution, however dignified or awful it may be, is nevertheless in truth useless. And other reasoners, who distrust this bare philosophy, have propounded subtle arguments to prove that these dignified parts of old governments are cardinal components of the essential apparatus, great pivots of substantial utility; and so they manufactured fallacies which the plainer school have well exposed. But both schools are in error. The dignified parts of government are those which bring it force--which attract its motive power. The efficient parts only employ that power. The comely parts of a government Have need, for they are those upon which its vital strength depends. They may not do anything definite that a simpler polity would not do better; but they...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 150 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 8mm | 281g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236595238
  • 9781236595232