The Fauna and Geography of the Maldive and Laccadive Archipelagoes; Being the Account of the Work Carried on and of the Collections Made by an Expedition During the Years 1899 and 1900

The Fauna and Geography of the Maldive and Laccadive Archipelagoes; Being the Account of the Work Carried on and of the Collections Made by an Expedition During the Years 1899 and 1900

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1906 edition. Excerpt: ...papillate or fasciculate above or merely a few twisted trabeculae. Increase by extra-or intracalicinal budding. Fission extremely rare. In section all more or less the same, little apparent variation. Locality. The species is fairly common on the reef-flat near the breaker zone and on the Maldive lagoon reefs, but seldom forms very large masses. Loose heads are frequently found on the boulder zone, where there is little or no sand or in hollows between other corals. When split open, their centres usually consist of their own remains, a good deal broken down by boring animals, often with Lithodomus and Gastropods. Their surfaces are frequently broken by the shield-like ends of Pyrgoma and the smaller oval openings of another barnacle in the walls. Generally the extreme forms are less affected than the intermediates. 42. Orbicella (Leptastraea) bottai (Ed. and H.). (PI. LXII1. fig. 36.) Cor. II. p. 486. Klz., p. 44, v. 9 and x. 13 a and b. Leptastraea inequalis Klz., p. 45, v. 6. I refer sixteen specimens to this species, with which Klunzinger's second species is undoubtedly synonymous. The specimens vary greatly in their different parts, and as compared with one another. The colonies are mostly rather flat and incrusting, but there is one large, round one, and one smaller and oval, almost completely covered with polyps. The corallites are round or compressed, and have their edges scarcely rising above the general level, or 1 mm. upstanding above the furrows, isolated ones rising to 2 or 3 mm., or on hillocks, etc., pressing over one another, to the last belonging the round form which in this respect is exactly as described by Klunzinger for L. inequalis. The calices of flat specimens and of the round one average 25 mm. in diameter, or somewhat...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 296 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 16mm | 531g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236509374
  • 9781236509376