The Farmer's and Planter's Encyclopaedia of Rural Affairs; Embracing All the Most Recent Discoveries in Agricultural Chemistry, Suited to the Comprehe

The Farmer's and Planter's Encyclopaedia of Rural Affairs; Embracing All the Most Recent Discoveries in Agricultural Chemistry, Suited to the Comprehe

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1869 edition. Excerpt: ...the limestone bed, when this is present, may be stated approximately at about one hundred feet. The only place in the whole district where it is practicable to ascertain, with any approach to accuracy, either the depth of the formation, or the relative situation and number of the separate beds which it comprises, is along the shore of Sandy Hook bay, in the cliffs of the Nevesink highlands. This, the only coast section of the strata, is still an imperfect one; large masses of the upper beds, fallen from above, covering the lower deposits near the water-side. "Owing to the large amount of water which it usually contains, the green sand is rarely penetrated in the numerous diggings which are made in it for the marl, to a greater depth than about twenty feet, the pits becoming at that limit too wet to be prosecuted deeper. "In one or two instances, wells have been sunk through the stratum, and the depth of the green sand ascertained to be about thirty feet, as already mentioned. "Spenfc Gravity.--The specific gravity of the green granular mineral, carefully freed from all extraneous adhering matter, is, according to several experiments cautiously made, about 2-65. Three different specimens, taken from remote localities, gave for the two lowest each 2-fi3; for the highest, 2-70. "The hardness of this mineral varies materially, being dependent somewhat upon the time elapsed after it has been dug: it is softest when moist and recently uncovered. Freshly extracted, its hardness often does not exceed that of talc; but when long uncovered and dry, it nearly equals that of gypsum. "It would appear by experiment to be entirely insoluble in water, both cold and boiling; but it dissolves with tolerable facility in any of the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 1148 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 57mm | 2,000g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236622847
  • 9781236622846