Farm Buildings and Building Construction in South Africa; A Text-Book for Farmers, Agricultural Student Teachers, Builders, Etc

Farm Buildings and Building Construction in South Africa; A Text-Book for Farmers, Agricultural Student Teachers, Builders, Etc

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1916 edition. Excerpt: ...well laid and finished, forms probably as good a floor as can be got, being specially satisfactory from a sanitary point of view. Such a floor may consist of 4 inches of concrete laid upon a 6-inch layer of hard-core, both hard-core and concrete being well rammed while being laid. The concrete may have proportions of 1: 3: 6 if the sand is very clean and otherwise suitable (say river sand); but if the sand be even only slightly dirty or fine in the grain, proportions not leaner than 1:2:4 should be adopted. The above 4-inch layer of concrete should be topped by a 1-inch layer of granolithic, as specified and explained on p. 133. To prevent slipping, the surface of the floor should be indented with grooves of V section, about f inch deep, and from 4 to 5 inches apart. With the same object in view the floor surface may be roughened by brushing it over with a stiff brush, before the granolithic has quite set. Hard blue bricks, if easily obtainable, may be used for the floor. Such a floor would consist of a lower layer of hard-core, a mid layer of 2 inches or 3 inches of concrete, and an upper layer of the hard blue bricks, laid as explained for stables in Chapter XVII., p. 185. It is impossible, however, to obtain bricks of uniform hardness, hence a hard blue-brick floor wears unevenly, and hollows soon form in its surface. Ordinary bricks are quite unsuitable as a flooring material, being much too soft and absorbent. The front part of the stalls, to a distance of about 3' 6" from the manger, may with advantage be laid with asphalte, clay, or ant-heap; this conduces to the comfort and warmth of the animals while they are lying. If asphalte be put down it may consist of a layer jj-inch thick carried on 3" of concrete....show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 92 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 181g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236964187
  • 9781236964182