A Family Approach to Psychiatric Disorders
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A Family Approach to Psychiatric Disorders

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Description

A Family Approach to Psychiatric Disorders reflects the remarkable changes in both psychiatry and family therapy over the past several decades. As Lyman C. Wynne, M.D., Ph.D., states in the Foreword, the book forges together psychiatric diagnosis and family therapy, bridging a gap created by the erroneous belief that these two realms are somehow incompatible. Rather than being blamed for the patient's illness, the family is treated as a focus for concern, study, and understanding. A chapter on family therapy is presented for each of the major DSM-IV disorders. The book also covers important but often neglected topics such as intimacy, emotions, countertransference traps, gender, ethnicity, and family loyalty.Trainees as well as seasoned mental health professionals will find this text indispensable when working with families of patients with psychiatric disorders. Family and individual therapists will find it equally valuable. By demonstrating a perspective that looks beyond an individual's presenting symptoms and by shedding light on the impact of the individual's problems on the rest of the family, A Family Approach to Psychiatric Disorders offers all practitioners the opportunity to increase their clinical effectiveness.show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 406 pages
  • 154.9 x 226.1 x 22.9mm | 657.72g
  • American Psychiatric Association Publishing
  • VA, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1585621986
  • 9781585621989

Review quote

In all A Family Approach to Psychiatric Disorders is well written, well organized and a useful addition to any family therapist's bookshelf. The bibliographies are located at the end of each chapter -- right where you need them. * Journal of Feminist Family Therapy *show more

About Richard A. Perlmutter

Richard A. Perlmutter, M.D., is Senior Psychiatrist at Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital, Towson, Maryland, and Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland. He is also an Approved Supervisor, American Association of Marriage and Family Therapists; and a member of the American Family Therapy Academy.show more

Flap copy

A Family Approach to Psychiatric Disorders reflects the remarkable changes in both psychiatry and family therapy over the past several decades. As Lyman C. Wynne, M.D., Ph.D., states in the Foreword, the book forges together psychiatric diagnosis and family therapy, bridging a gap created by the erroneous belief that these two realms are somehow incompatible. Rather than being blamed for the patient's illness, the family is treated as a focus for concern, study, and understanding. A chapter on family therapy is presented for each of the major DSM-IV disorders. The book also covers important but often neglected topics such as intimacy, emotions, countertransference traps, gender, ethnicity, and family loyalty. Trainees as well as seasoned mental health professionals will find this text indispensable when working with families of patients with psychiatric disorders. Family and individual therapists will find it equally valuable. By demonstrating a perspective that looks beyond an individual's presenting symptoms and by shedding light on the impact of the individual's problems on the rest of the family, A Family Approach to Psychiatric Disorders offers all practitioners the opportunity to increase their clinical effectiveness.show more

Table of contents

A treatment synthesis. Getting started. Adjustment disorders. Mood disorders. Schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders. Substance-related disorders. Anxiety disorders. Eating disorders. Somatoform disorders. Factitious disorders. Dissociative disorders. Sleep disorders. Sexual and gender identity disorders. Delirium, dementia, and amnestic and other cognitive disorders. Impulse disorders not elsewhere classified. Disorders usually first diagnosed in infancy, childhood, or adolescence. Personality disorders. Glossary. Index.show more