Facts and Enquiries Respecting the Source of Epidemia; With an Historical Catalogue of the Numerous Visitations of Plague, Pestilence, and Famine, from the Earliest Period of the World to the Present Day. to Which Are Added, Observations

Facts and Enquiries Respecting the Source of Epidemia; With an Historical Catalogue of the Numerous Visitations of Plague, Pestilence, and Famine, from the Earliest Period of the World to the Present Day. to Which Are Added, Observations

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1832 edition. Excerpt: ...observation is, that in other cases, less obviously epidemical, a more local or limited operation of similar atmospherical causes is rendered probable: since it has been always admitted that similar effects must be the result of similar causes; and that the assumption of more causes than are necessary for the efi'ects, is a violation of the simple and invariable rule of philosophizing. Besides the regular periods of intermittents, some' disorders have acquired as it were the habit of returning at particular hours of the day or night, as I have before hinted at: rheumatism, and other inflammatory affections, erysi pelas, headache, the pains in the periosteum of bones, or in the parts where fractures have united, or wounds healed, have under a variety of circumstances acquired the habit of periodic returns: fits of melancholy, hysteric affections, and various forms of nervous diseases, have done the same, not only occurring at times of the month, but at particular hours of the day. In all these cases it may be a fit subject of enquiry, whether the periods in each case were superinduced by habit, or were the result of external influence. Sincel wrote the first part of this present section, I have seen some cases of epidemical angina pectoris, or rather of some obscure disorder, which in symptoms resembled that dreadful malady, but which fluctuated with the weather and eventually subsided, without being much affected by the medicinal measures resorted to for the alleviation of the symptoms. One of the most remarkable things about some diseases is their annual period: cases occur of not only the gout, or the ague, but of erysipelas, melancholy, and' very numerous forms of disease, which different individuals have regularly incurred...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 76 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 154g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236871774
  • 9781236871770