The Facts of the Case; A Summary of the Most Important Evidence and Argument Presented in the Report of the Royal Commission on the Liquor Traffic

The Facts of the Case; A Summary of the Most Important Evidence and Argument Presented in the Report of the Royal Commission on the Liquor Traffic

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1896 edition. Excerpt: ...the enforcement of the law was taken hold of vigorously. Mr. Jones' evidence described the result as follows: --Qaes. You know about them: will you make a statement in regard to them?--Arts. I will confine myself to what we call police offences, that is, cases I can adjudicate upon finally, not those that have to go to the Queen's Bench for trial. These comprise drunk and disorderly cases sent to the lock-up, drunken persons for furious driving, and that is a very common offence; indecency while in a case of intoxication, a few cases of neglect to provide for family resulting entirely from the dissipated habits of the father, common assaults not accompanied with bloodshed (in all cases from drunkenness) and the use of abusive language to men and women, all these are directly traceable to drink. Of that class of offences the average number adjudicated by me for 6 years previous to 1885, that would be from the time we originally commenced the prosecutions under the Dunkin Act in 1879, was 30 per annum. I take May as the commencement of the license year: from May, 1885, to May, 1886, 37 cases; from May, 1886, to May, 1887, 39 cases. During all this time the Act was nominally in force. Ques. But it was a dead letter?--Ans. Partly. From May, 1887, to May, 1888, and the broken period up to November, the offences were 86. The Act became effective in November, 1888, and from 29th November, 1888, to May, 1890 (I am taking in one year and a half), I had 17 cases. From May, 1890, to May, 1892 (I do not know why my clerk made it two years, but he has for some reason) I had 13 cases. Since May, 1892, I have had none at all. Ques. What is the population?--Ans. The population of the town is 2,500, but I adjudicate for the county. My practical jurisdiction would...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 110 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 213g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236596544
  • 9781236596543