Explication of an Engraving Called the Origin of the Rites and Worship of the Hebrews; Together with Remarks on Creation, and a Brief Account of Some Observances and Their Symbolical Signification

Explication of an Engraving Called the Origin of the Rites and Worship of the Hebrews; Together with Remarks on Creation, and a Brief Account of Some Observances and Their Symbolical Signification

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1859 edition. Excerpt: ...labors and withdraw to our firesides. The salutation has, perhaps, some reference to the planets in recognition of their beneficent influence. The bouquet, formed of three species, is certainly the emblem of the three elements. The waving of the palm branch represents the air, the myrtle is the emblem of fire, and the willow of the brook (which must not be gathered from any other place) clearly indicates the water. The fruit ethrog signifies the earth, and the waving the whole toward the four cardinal points has reference to the wind, which acts upon the air and cooperates in the work of increase. And in doing all this, we offer thanksgiving to the Lord Eternal for that He has brought us forth from Egypt that we may celebrate the festival of nature. This is doubtless what Sacred Scripture indicates, when, in the chapter of Leviticus already quoted, verse forty-three, it declares--: d'hxh yum ntiut Whs.kibi "oa nx vatm msoa "I caused the children of Israel to dwell in booths when I brought them forth from the land of Egypt." The seventh day of the festival is, even in a degree exceeding those that precede it, consecrated to religious observances. Its name is san sasmn, " the great Hoshannah," and the observances all take place in the synagogue. Every Israelite must provide himself with a bouquet, formed of five slight branches of willow, fresh gathered from a brook, and from no other place. Prayers of deep feeling and impresgiveness are then pronounced, in which the words -k fire and ma water are frequently introduced. At the conclusion of the service the leaves of these slight branches of willow are knocked off. The vulgar opinion is, that as the leaves are struck off the branch, he who goes through the ceremony divests or strips himself of...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 28 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 68g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236678427
  • 9781236678423