The Expert Wood Finisher; A Complete Manual of the Art and Practice of Finishing Woods by Staining, Filling, Varnishing, Waxing, Etc

The Expert Wood Finisher; A Complete Manual of the Art and Practice of Finishing Woods by Staining, Filling, Varnishing, Waxing, Etc

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1912 edition. Excerpt: ...then apply a coat of best copal varnish. A stained surface may be brightened by the application of this mixture: Nitric acid I oz., muriatic acid J; oz., tin, in grains, -If oz., soft water 2 oz. Place these ingredients in a bottle and shake occasionally, allowing it to stand several days before using. Use as a size or wash over a stained surface, to brighten or enliven it, where the coloring is too dull, A yellow effect may be given to walnut wood by the ' application of picric acid, which will liven up the tone of the wood. Picric acid is a poison, therefore be careful. SHELLAC VARNISH-AC is a resinous incrustation excreted by a ' scale insect known as Tachardia lacca. The mouth parts of this insect consist of a beak or sucking apparatus combined with a pointed lancet. With this lancet the insect pierces the bark of the twig of the tree, and then inserts a sucking tube and draws up the sap. The insect Inlay be likened to an animated siphon, since the sap, continually sucked up through the beak, is, after modification and absorption of some of its products, given out as an excretion at the anal end of the body. This secretion solidifies in contact with the air, and thus there is gradually formed around the body a scale or cell, popularly known as "lac." STICK-LAC AND OTHER VARIETIEs.--VVere only a single insect present on a branch the scale would appear as a circular, dome-shaped, reddish excrescence on the surface of the bark. Owing, however, to the production by the female of a very large number of eggs, often as many as I,00O, and the habit of the insects, which indeed is common to many of the family, of living and feeding gregariously, closely packed together on one twig, the scales or cells coalesce during their...show more

Product details

  • Paperback
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 172g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • English
  • Illustrations, black and white
  • 123684422X
  • 9781236844224