Experimental Studies of Mental Defectives; A Critique of the Binet-Simon Tests and a Contribution to the Psychology of Epilepsy

Experimental Studies of Mental Defectives; A Critique of the Binet-Simon Tests and a Contribution to the Psychology of Epilepsy

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. 1912 edition.: ...and XIII an increase of efficiency or capacity with increasing B-S. age is shown by a progressive diminution of the time of execution. In the corresponding graphs (II, IV and VI) this is shown by a drop in the curves. The Time Needed to Name the Four Colors--Red, Yellow, Green and Blue. The time required to name the four colors, Table X, does, indeed, decrease with increasing B.-S. age, but the decrease from year to year is not very regular, as seen at a glance in Graph II. There are numerous exceptions in the averages for the general population, the children and the adults. The exceptions are least numerous among the girls and women. The differences, however, between the groups, the imbeciles and morons, for all patients, 4 seconds, and especially between Age III and Age XIII, about 7 seconds, are quite considerable. The difference between the averages of Ages VI and VII and of the moron group is much greater for the adults than for the children (3.7 sec. compared with 1.1); for the girls than for the boys (.9 as against.2), and for the men than for the women (6.8 as against 3.1). The sex differences are also brought out by the general averages for Ages VI to XIII, from which it appears that the girls are superior to the boys (average of 4.9 sec. compared with 5.7); the women to the men (5.2 compared with 7.9); and the children to the adults (5.7 compared with 6.5). In such a simple trait as the time of naming four colors it may be assumed in harmony with the above findings that increasing maturity will not accelerate the speed after the colors have once been really learned. The following conclusions seem to be justified: (1) Significant sex and maturity differences (differences between the juvenile and adult periods of life) are brought out in so simple a test as the speed of naming the four fundamental colors. Epileptic children are superior to adults, and girls and women to boys and men. That normal girls excel normal boys in the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 34 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 82g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English, Latin
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236608380
  • 9781236608383