The Expedition to Borneo of H. M. S. Dido for the Suppression of Piracy; With Extracts from the Journal of James Brooke Esq., of Sarawak ...

The Expedition to Borneo of H. M. S. Dido for the Suppression of Piracy; With Extracts from the Journal of James Brooke Esq., of Sarawak ...

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1847 edition. Excerpt: ... the Rajah, and to urge him in every way in my power to do what he was bound to do as an act of common honesty. Should these means fail, after making the strongest representations and giving amplest time, I considered myself free to extort by force what I could not gain by fair means. "Having determined on these steps, I met the Rajah by appointment, and repeated all my grievances, and set strongly before him the injury done in consequence; and lastly, plainly told him that I only came and now only stayed in his country at his request, but that the property he had taken must be repaid, and subsequently to that, if he had any proposition to make, I would endeavour to meet his wishes. To all this I received no one satisfactory answer, and, from the shuffling on every complaint, I formed the worst opinion of his intentions. "My determination, however, having been previously made, the result of this conversation had no effect upon me; and at the end of three days, the time I had limited, no letter for the Sultan being forthcoming, on the fourth morning the two schooners proceeded to sea, one for Borneo, the INTERNATIONAL LAW. 221 other for Singapore, whilst, with three companions, I remained in my new house.1 "I wish now to discuss a question which has often occupied my mind, and upon which I have been very desirous to arrive at a right conclusion. It is certain that a British subject cannot wrongfully attack or injure any prince or person in his own country without rendering himself liable to be punished by the laws of England. It is both right and just that it should be so, because in demi-civilised or savage countries the natives are often unable to protect themselves, and an attack upon them savours of piracy. On the other...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 104 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 200g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236750748
  • 9781236750747