Exercises in Greek Composition; Based on Xenophon's Anabasis and Hellenica, with Notes, Vocabulary, and References to the Grammars of Goodwin and Hadley-Allen

Exercises in Greek Composition; Based on Xenophon's Anabasis and Hellenica, with Notes, Vocabulary, and References to the Grammars of Goodwin and Hadley-Allen

By (author) 

List price: US$14.13

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1897 edition. Excerpt: ...2. &ye 5i. see G. 1345; H. 6. partic., having done wicked1037, 4. ness. 3. = make war again.. 7. partic., G. 1580; H. 983. 4. a liar and a perjurer. 8. see Intr. XXV. (2). Lesson XXXVIII. Fighting at Dascylium. Conditions. G. 1397; 1403; 1408. H. 895; 898; 900. Agesilaus immediately issued orders to his troops to make themselves ready to take the field, Ostensibly intending to march into Caria, where Tissaphernes just then was. When 2the latter heard this, he supposed that Agesilaus would, in reality, march to Caria, in order to take vengeance on him. He, accordingly, sent thither his whole infantry force, but proceeded, himself, with his cavalry, to the plain of the Maeander, saying 3 to the people about him that if the Greeks 4 should engage battle with him there, his cavalry would be sufficient to trample them under foot. But, instead 5of going to Caria, Agesilaus turned his course to Phrygia, of which Pharnabazus was satrap. Pharnabazus would, perhaps, have prevented him 6from invading his land, if he had not likewise supposed that Agesilaus would attack Tissaphernes. Accordingly, the Greeks marched through Phrygia for a long time in security, took much booty, and, whenever a city offered resistance to them, they conquered it without much difficulty. But, 7in the vicinity of Dascylium, they fell in with some Persian horsemen who had been sent thither by Pharnabazus. These soon got into a hand-to-hand fight with the Greek cavalry, who were riding in advance. The lances of the Greeks were soon broken, while8 the Persians, who had tougher spears, in a short time killed twelve horsemen and two horses. The Greeks would have 9suffered a great loss, if Agesilaus had not at once come to their aid with the hoplites. Then the barbarians withdrew....show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 32 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 77g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236521609
  • 9781236521606