Excursions in the County of Norfolk; Comprising a Brief Historical and Topographical Delineation of Every Town and Village, Together with Descriptions of the Residences of the Nobility and Gentry, Remains of Antiquity, and Every Volume 1

Excursions in the County of Norfolk; Comprising a Brief Historical and Topographical Delineation of Every Town and Village, Together with Descriptions of the Residences of the Nobility and Gentry, Remains of Antiquity, and Every Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1818 edition. Excerpt: ...on our right is the little village of Maunby. The family of Mauteby had a considerable interest in this place so early as the tenth year of Richard I., and continued here till 1481, when they were succeeded by the Pastons. "At the east end of the church against the south wall lies a curious antique monument; a stone coffin, about a foot and a half deep, resting on the pavement, and about seven feet in length; on the lid, or cover, the whole being of grey marble, are the effigies of a Knight Templar, cross-legged, in armour, in full proportion, his sword in a broad belt hanging over his shoulder, in memory of a knight of the family of De Mauteby, and living, as the monument bespeaks, about the year 1250." The south aisle of this church, where many of the Mautebys were buried, has fallen to ruins; it had been rebuilt by Margaret Paston, the heiress of the family, who was also interred here. At the distance of 20 miles from Norwich we now arrive at Caistor, next Yarmouth. In the celebrated Notitia Imperii, or survey of the Roman empire, published by Pancirollus in 1593, it appears that the Roman commander of the Stablesian horse, under the Count of the Saxon shore, .in Britain, was stationed at a place called Garianonum, or the mouth of the Gariensis or Yare; but where that ancient fortress was situated authors are not exactly agreed. Camden places it at Burgh Castle, in Suffolk, and says that Yarmouth rose out of. its ruins. Sir Henry Spelman places it at Cais H tor. There is no doubt that the Romans at different times occupied both these places, as each port became more or less navigable. It is certain that an arm of the sea, which formerly overflowed the marshes between Yarmouth and Norwich, must nearly have reached Burgh Castle, and...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 60 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 127g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236600592
  • 9781236600592