Excelsior Elementary Studies in English Grammar; With Numerous Examples and Exercises in Analysis and Parsing

Excelsior Elementary Studies in English Grammar; With Numerous Examples and Exercises in Analysis and Parsing : Designed for Schools and Academies

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1883 edition. Excerpt: ...Rules of Grammar. We learn the parts of speech in Etymology, and therefore we divide Syntax into two parts: I. Analysis. II. Parsing and Rules of Syntax. I. ANALYSI S. 169. Analysis is the division of a sentence into its parts. The word "analysis" comes from the Greek analusis, a resolving into parts. 170. Every complete sentence is a statement made about some person or thing. Hence every sentence can be divided into two principal parts: 1. The person or thing about which the statement is made. 2. The statement made about that person or thing. Examples: "Birds fly." This sentence is a statement about "birds," namely, that they "fly," "John wrote a letter." This sentence is a statement about "John" namely, that he "wrote a letter." "Snow is tvhite." This sentence is a statement about "snoiv," namely, that it "is white." 171. These two principal parts of every sentence are called the Subject and the Predicate. 172. The Subject is the person or thing about which a statement is made. 173. The Predicate is the statement made about the Subject. The word "subject " (in Grammar) means "the matter treated of," and comes from the Latin subjectus, placed under, that is, under consideration. The word "predicate " means "that which is said of something else," and comes from the Latin ' praedicaiv," to proclaim, to declare. 174. The subject may be found by putting tbe interrogatives "who" or "what" before the verb. Examples: "John wrote a letter." Who wrote a letter? Answer, John. "Time flies." What flies? Answer, Time. 175. The subject may be a noun, a pronoun, a verb...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 36 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 82g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236903986
  • 9781236903983