The Excellency of Monarchial Government, Especially of the English Monarchy; Wherein Is Largely Treated of the Several Benefits of Kingly Government, and the Inconvenience of Commonwealths

The Excellency of Monarchial Government, Especially of the English Monarchy; Wherein Is Largely Treated of the Several Benefits of Kingly Government, and the Inconvenience of Commonwealths

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1686 edition. Excerpt: ...Authority 'os the same. All the other Acts which are not Grants of Aid, Asiistance, or-Supply, are conceived in the latter words. t By this full enumeration of' the most considerable Expreffious, either of Records or Historians, relating to the Great Councils or Parliaments from Vl/'illiam the Conqueror? time to this present Age, (which in a continued seriesos time I have deduced, it appears, that till King Jo/nfs time, only the Prelates, Earls, and Barons, and such of the great Tenents in 'Capite as were not Barons, were summoned, and at the Kings pleasure by special Writz and after King Johns Charter, the lesser Tenents in Capite by General Summons. Also, that the Charters of Kings wherein they granted Liberties to their Subjects were received as Laws, and 'gave as ample' Satisfaction as now The King willeth, doth to pass a Bill rendred for his Royal Assent by both Housesz and there was good reason, because it paffedundet his Broad Seal. ' Likewise, when the Constitution of Parliament was altered, 49 H. 3. whereby in place of the Tenents in Capite, which were numerous, two Knights were chosen, probably by the rest of the Tenents in. Capite for the Shires, and two Citizens, and two Burgesses for Burroughs, to represent all those that held in Capite, and it is likely all other their Subfeudatary Tenentsz yet the number was not constantly observed, there bejng sometimes Knights, and no Citizens or Burgeffes, sometimes one Knight, one Citizen, and one Burgess, 'other times two or three Knights, left 'as itseems to the Sheriffs; or the Chusers Election, till aster it wasfixed' as it now is, for two Knights, two Citizens, and two Burgesses, unless in some places ofssWaler, where to this Day, some two or three Burroughs chuse but one or two...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 56 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 118g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123676529X
  • 9781236765291