An Examination of the Advantages of Solitude; And of Its Operations on the Heart and Mind; With an Inquiry Into Its Prejudicial Influences on the Imagination and Passions Volume 1

An Examination of the Advantages of Solitude; And of Its Operations on the Heart and Mind; With an Inquiry Into Its Prejudicial Influences on the Imagination and Passions Volume 1

By (author) 

List price: US$21.03

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1808 edition. Excerpt: ...of ourminds, than it ought. While our attention is employed with useful occupation, sorrow takes less hold upon the mind. In literary composition we can instantly banish ill-humour, by veliting our spleen in our book; thus we often take up the pen with-frowns of discontent and lay it down again with a smile. Our time and our life is mispent if we give way to all the difliculties, cares, and perplexities which attend it. We become incapable of any great or manly action, if we occupy ourselves only with trifling circumstances, and never have the courage to engage in any undertaking, only on account of its difliculty or danger. " The main of life," as an English writer has admirably observed, "is, indeed, composed of small incidents and petty occurrences, of wishes for objects not remote, and grief for disappointments, of no fatal consequence, of in sect vexations, which sting us and fly away, impertinences which buzz a-while about us, and are heard no more: of tneteorous pleasures, which dance before us, and are dissipated: of compliments which glide off the soul like other music, and are forgotten by-him that gave and him that received Life would afford abundant leisure for every purpose, if we could not only prevent the intrusion of others, but were guilty of no misapplication of it ourselves. He who, in his youth, has learned nothing but the art of devoting every hour to useful employment, has acquired the principal requisite of a man of business. But, either out of ill-humour or indolence, before we undertake any task, we consuit our convenience, hesitate, and endeavour to-persuade ourselves that it is not yet a proper season for the work. Our indolence must be gained over by caresses, before it is converted into...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 108 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 209g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236932501
  • 9781236932501