The Evolution of Modern Philosophy: The Philosophy of Biology: An Episodic History
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The Evolution of Modern Philosophy: The Philosophy of Biology: An Episodic History

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Description

Is life different from the non-living? If so, how? And how, in that case, does biology as the study of living things differ from other sciences? These questions are traced through an exploration of episodes in the history of biology and philosophy. The book begins with Aristotle, then moves on to Descartes, comparing his position with that of Harvey. In the eighteenth century the authors consider Buffon and Kant. In the nineteenth century the authors examine the Cuvier-Geoffroy debate, pre-Darwinian geology and natural theology, Darwin and the transition from Darwin to the revival of Mendelism. Two chapters deal with the evolutionary synthesis and such questions as the species problem, the reducibility or otherwise of biology to physics and chemistry, and the problem of biological explanation in terms of function and teleology. The final chapters reflect on the implications of the philosophy of biology for philosophy of science in general.
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Product details

  • Paperback | 440 pages
  • 152 x 229 x 25mm | 640g
  • Cambridge, United Kingdom
  • English
  • 2 Line drawings, unspecified
  • 0521643805
  • 9780521643801
  • 788,015

Table of contents

1. Aristotle and after; 2. Descartes, Harvey and the emergence of modern mechanism; 3. The eighteenth century: Buffon; 4. The eighteenth century II: Kant the development of German biology; 5. Before Darwin I: A continental controversy; 6. Before Darwin II: British controversies about geology and natural theology; 7. Darwin; 8. Evolution and heredity from Darwin to the rise of genetics; 9. The modern evolutionary synthesis and its discontents; 10. Some themes in recent philosophy of biology: The species problem, reducibility, function and teleology; 11. Biology and human nature; 12. The philosophy of biology and the philosophy of science.
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Review quote

'... this is a book we all need and for which we should all be grateful ... this is an important book and, even if you only dip into it here and there, it is a work that should be on the shelf of every philosopher of biology ... Marjorie Grene and David Depew have written a really good book - too good just to praise. Let the arguments begin!' Biology and Philosophy "This book contains detailed observations and critical reflections that help to clarify the philosophical problems associated with experimental biology. Staying true to his subject matter, the author does not present a 'one size fits all' solution to the philosophy of experimental biology. Similar to experiments, these questions are very much a work in progress. And by showing what we miss if we do not pay attention to these issues, Weber has done us all an enormous service." The Quarterly Review of Biology, Manfred D. Laubichler "The work of Grene and Depew is a pleasing addition to the literature on philosophy of biology."
Jeremy Kirby, Quarterly Review of Biology
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