Evidence Taken by the Interstate Commerce Commission in the Matter of Proposed Advances in Freight Rates by Carriers. August to December, 1910 Volume 9

Evidence Taken by the Interstate Commerce Commission in the Matter of Proposed Advances in Freight Rates by Carriers. August to December, 1910 Volume 9

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1911 edition. Excerpt: ...on the common stock, and certainly that is not putting the company in any too good condition. Further along in the record, he said: My thought is that at least that much money should be spent in property each year to afford a proper basis of support for the existing credits. repeating it. So there is no doubt that not merely, as Mr. Clyde Brown had in his mind, had Mr. Willard gotten that from bankers, but Mr. Willard said that those were his thoughts and his standard, as he considered it. I take it that the criticism of the question that I put was from a misapprehension upon Mr. Brown's part, and would not have been made if he had had the record before him, or if I had had the record before me at the time, so that I could have called his attention to it. Mr. Bond. What Mr. Willard said was applied to the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad. He did not undertake to lay down any general standard for railroads. He did not undertake to lay down any general standards for railroads. He said the Pennsylvania's dollar for dollar was as much better as the Pennsylvania property showed for itself. He said that the Baltimore & Ohio could not get along with less. That is the point he made. Mr. James. As a matter of fact, if your honors examine the record, notwithstanding all that Mr. McCrea said as to the standard, there never has been, except in spasmodic years, any time when the Pennsylvania put back into the property a dollar out of the surplus for every dollar that they spent in the way of dividends to the stockholders. It is very much less. So that Mr. McCrea had some standard that no railroad in this country--not even his own railroad--had ever put in practice as a transportation dogma, or a transportation principle, or whatever you may call it. It is...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 136 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 254g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236510070
  • 9781236510075