Evidence Taken by the Interstate Commerce Commission in the Matter of Proposed Advances in Freight Rates by Carriers. August to December, 1910 Volume 3

Evidence Taken by the Interstate Commerce Commission in the Matter of Proposed Advances in Freight Rates by Carriers. August to December, 1910 Volume 3

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1911 edition. Excerpt: ...dragged down to a lower basis than they should be because of the low Chicago basis from New York. Mr. Lyon. What I want to know now is, do you understand that this advance in rates affect any of those rates between local points? Mr. Thayer. I do not know: I can not testify as to that. Examiner Brown. It is the fact, is it not. Mr. Thayer, that the New York-Chicago rate is a base rate, and it is scaled down on fixed percentages from Chicago east and from New York west, and that when you automatically raise the base rate you also raise the rates based thereon? Mr. Thayer. Well, that is true. Mr. Brown; you are quite right, as to. the rate, I think that he was talking about. But it has never been scaled within the territory on our lines, the Reading and the Central Railroad of New Jersey, and the Lackawanna, etc., that I spoke about. We never have scaled, because we believed the rates were fair as they were. Mr. Lyon. Now, Mr. Thayer, with regard to this expense of handling traffic: You have given some suggestion here, as I understood you, to the effect that the railroads were somewhat justified in increasing these class rates because the traffic was in less than carload shipments, and was probably more expensive to handle than the carload or commodity traffic. Mr. Thayer. Yes. Mr. Lyon. Of course that has always been recognized by tho railroads in making their rates. These class rates that have been in effect for the last 30 years have probably been constructed with that knowledge before the traffic department. Mr. Thayer. I do not think they were, Mr. Lyon. That is my point. I do not think they were constructed with that knowledge before them; otherwise they would never have been on the low basis that they are. They have been a growth. They have...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 292 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 15mm | 526g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236607732
  • 9781236607737