The Every-Day Book and Table Book; Or, Everlasting Calendar of Popular Amusements, Sports, Pastimes, Ceremonies, Manners, Customs, and Events, Incident to Each of the Three Hundred and Sixty-Five Days, in Past and Present Times; Volume 2

The Every-Day Book and Table Book; Or, Everlasting Calendar of Popular Amusements, Sports, Pastimes, Ceremonies, Manners, Customs, and Events, Incident to Each of the Three Hundred and Sixty-Five Days, in Past and Present Times; Volume 2

By (author) 

List price: US$22.39

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1830 edition. Excerpt: ...his death. ' One of the answers to the editor's request for particulars concerning the Garrett election, is the following letter: --1 To the Editor of the Every-Day Book. ' Sir, ---After frequently promising to do something for the Every-Day Book, I yesterday threw hastily together a few particulars regarding "sir Jeffery Dunstana" they are authentic and at your service. Sir Jeffery, towards the latter part of his life, had a hoarse rough voice and bad utterance, from having lost the whole of his front teeth. The manner of his losing them is curious enough, and worth relating. He was one evening reciting his speeches at the " London Hospital" public-house, Whitechapel, where some young students were amusing themselves, who, seeing " sir.leffery" in" merry mood," hit upon a plan to have the teeth out of his head. A bargain was soon struck, ten shillings were clubbed among them, a pint of "Hodges's best" was brought in----sir Jeffery sat down in the chair, and out came tooth the first--in the same manner out came an0ther--and so, time after time, the wicked wags proceeded till they got them all. At this house sir'Jefi'ery was near losing his life, in addition to his teeth. He was "in the chair," as usual, which was placed on the table, and he was supported by his friends "Ray the tinker," who now lies in the same grave with him, and a " sir Charles Hartis," a deformed fidler, and an unsuccessful candidate for Garratt honours. Such a trio was scarcely ever seen, and very attractive. The sixpences collected from visiters, on entering, lay in a plate on the table, and "sir Jeffery" was_on his legs giving them " old wigs," in his...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 432 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 22mm | 767g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236869354
  • 9781236869357