The European Reformations Sourcebook

The European Reformations Sourcebook

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This revised and expanded volume brings together a carefully-selected collection of primary sources drawn from medieval and sixteenth-century texts. Notable for its comprehensive coverage, it consolidates a broad range of important documents, which until now, have been scattered through numerous volumes of primary materials.
* An invaluable collection of primary sources, edited by a renowned reformations scholar, which brings together significant and illuminating documents from this influential period * Revised and updated to include catechetical writings by Luther and Calvin, and increased analysis of their theological writings, as well as coverage of women reformers such as Caritas Pirckheimer, Katharina Schutz-Zell, and Olimpia Morata * Includes a broad range of documents spanning major theological writings through to confessions, political grievances, and writings drawn from tracts, poems, and satires * Features observer accounts of events and debates that lucidly depict the personalities of the reformers, offering students their first direct engagement with participants in the European reformations * Creates an ideal accompaniment to Lindberg s The European Reformations, 2nd edition, or can be used alongside any text on the European reformations for a complete learning guide
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Product details

  • Paperback | 296 pages
  • 169 x 241 x 10mm | 502g
  • New York, United States
  • English
  • 2nd Edition
  • 0470673281
  • 9780470673287
  • 84,861

Back cover copy

This revised and expanded volume brings together a carefully-selected collection of primary sources drawn from medieval and sixteenth-century texts. Particularly notable for its comprehensive coverage, it consolidates a broad range of important documents, which until now, have been scattered through numerous volumes of primary materials. These comprise not only the major institutional and theological writings of the time, but also popular expressions of religious and political grievances, including Flugschriften, poems, satires, sermons, as well as women's writings.

The Sourcebook has been updated to include catechetical writings by Luther and Calvin, which illustrate these reformers' efforts to instill their religious beliefs, along with increased coverage of their theological writings. Also included are observer accounts of events and debates that lucidly depict the personalities of the reformers, offering students their first direct engagement with participants in the European reformations. In addition, it expands the coverage of women reformers, and now incorporates the writings of figures including Caritas Pirckheimer, Katharina Schütz-Zell, and Olimpia Morata.

This invaluable sourcebook is an ideal accompaniment to Lindberg's The European Reformations, 2nd edition, or may be used alongside any text on the European reformations for a complete learning guide to this important and influential period.
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Table of contents

Preface to the Second Edition xvi Preface to the First Edition xviii Abbreviations xx 1 The Late Middle Ages 1 1.1 Jean de Venette: Chronicle 3 1.2 Social Tensions: The Reformation of the Emperor Sigismund (c.1438) 3 1.3 The Crisis of Values: Reynard the Fox (1498) 4 1.4 Jakob Wimpfeling: The Origins of Printing, from Epitome Rerum Germanicarum (1505) 5 1.5 Sebastian Brant: The Ship of Fools 5 1.6 The Piper of Niklashausen, A Report of His Preaching (1476) 7 1.7 Ulrich von Hutten: Vadiscum oder die Romishe Dreifaltigkeit (1519) 8 1.8 Jacob Wimpfeling: Grievances of the German Nation (1515) 8 1.9 Pope Boniface VIII: Unam Sanctam (1302) 9 1.10 Pope Clement VI: Unigenitus Dei Filius (1343) 10 1.11 Pope Sixtus IV: Salvator Noster (1476) 10 1.12 Marsilius of Padua: Defensor Pacis (1324) 10 1.13 Conciliarism: Opinion of the University of Paris (1393) 11 1.14 Pierre D Ailly: Conciliar Principles (1409) 11 1.15 The Council of Constance: Haec Sancta (1415) and Frequens (1417) 12 1.16 Pope Pius II: Execrabilis (1460) 12 1.17 Pope Leo X: Pastor Aeternus (1516) 13 1.18 John Wyclif: On Indulgences 13 1.19 John Hus: The Treatise on the Church 13 1.20 Gabriel Biel: Doing What is in One 14 1.21 Johannes Tauler, OP: Sermon Extract 14 1.22 Theologia Deutsch 15 1.23 Ludolf of Saxony: Vita Jesu Christi 15 1.24 Gerard Zerbolt: The Spiritual Ascents 16 1.25 Thomas a Kempis: The Imitation of Christ 16 1.26 Johannes von Staupitz: Sermon Extracts 17 1.27 Dietrich Kolde: A Fruitful Mirror or Small Handbook for Christians (1508) 17 1.28 Francois Rabelais: On Education 18 1.29 Lorenzo Valla: The Falsely Believed and Forged Donation of Constantine 19 1.30 Nicholas of Lyra: Interpretation of the Bible 19 1.31 Desiderius Erasmus: Praise of Folly (1509) 20 1.32 Erasmus, Letter to Martin Dorp (1515) 21 1.33 Ulrich von Hutten: Letters from Obscure Men (1515) 21 2 The Dawn of a New Era 23 2.1 Martin Luther: Recollections of Becoming a Monk 24 2.2 Luther s Conversion 25 2.3 Luther s Theological Emphases 25 2.4 Luther: Disputation Against Scholastic Theology (1517) 26 2.5 Official Catalogue of Relics in the Wittenberg Castle Church 27 2.6 Archbishop Albert of Mainz: The Commission of Indulgences 27 2.7 Tetzel: A Sample Sermon 28 2.8 A Contemporary Description of Indulgence Selling 29 2.9 The Robbing of Tetzel 29 2.10 Luther: The Ninety-five Theses (1517) 29 2.11 Bucer s Description of Luther at the Heidelberg Disputation (1518) 30 2.12 Prierias: Dialogue Against the Arrogant Theses of Martin Luther on the Power of the Pope (1518) 31 2.13 Luther s Hearing before Cardinal Cajetan at Augsburg (1518) 31 2.14 Georg Spalatin: Recollections of Frederick the Wise on Luther 32 2.15 Peter Mosellanus: Description of Luther, Karlstadt, and Eck at the Leipzig Debate 32 2.16 Capito: Letter of Support to Luther (February 1519) 33 2.17 Luther: Treatise on Good Works (June 1520) 34 2.18 Luther: To the Christian Nobility of the German Nation Concerning the Reform of the Christian Estate (1520) 34 2.19 Luther: The Babylonian Captivity of the Church (1520) 37 2.20 Luther: The Freedom of a Christian (1520) 40 2.21 Pope Leo X: Exsurge domine (June 15, 1520) 41 2.22 The Papal Nuncio s Reports from the Diet of Worms 41 2.23 Luther before Emperor and Empire at the Diet of Worms (1521) 42 2.24 Charles V: Message to his Council (April 19, 1521) 43 2.25 The Edict of Worms (May 26, 1521) 44 2.26 Albrecht Durer s Diary: Rumors of Luther s Capture (1521) 45 3 Implementation of Reforms 46 3.1 Thomas More to Martin Dorp (1515) 47 3.2 Erasmus: Paraclesis (1516) 48 3.3 Luther: On Translating: An Open Letter (1530) 48 3.4 Luther: A Brief Instruction on What to Look For and Expect in the Gospels (1521) 49 3.5 Jorg Vogeli: Letter to Konrad Zwick (1523) 50 3.6 Philipp Melanchthon: On Improving the Studies of Youth (1518) 50 3.7 Melanchthon: Theses Against Scholastic Theology (1520) 51 3.8 Andreas Bodenstein von Karlstadt: The 151 Theses (1517) 52 3.9 Karlstadt: The Meaning of the Term Gelassen and Where in Holy Scripture It is Found (1523) 52 3.10 The Hammer of Witches (1486) 53 3.11 Karlstadt: Exposition of Numbers 30 Which Speaks of Vows (1522) 54 3.12 Luther: The Judgment of Martin Luther on Monastic Vows (1521) 54 3.13 Luther: The Estate of Marriage (1522) 55 3.14 Ursala of Munsterberg: A Nun Explains Her Leaving the Convent (1528) 56 3.15 Argula von Grumbach 56 3.16 Katharina Schutz Zell: Writings on Reformation and Marriage 57 3.17 Katherine Rem: A Nun Rejects the Reformation (1523) 58 3.18 Caritas Pirckheimer: A Journal of the Reformation Years 1524 1528 58 3.19 Karlstadt: On the Abolition of Images and That There Should Be No Beggars Among Christians (1522) 59 3.20 The Wittenberg Movement: The University Report to Elector Frederick (1521) 61 3.21 The Wittenberg Movement by the End of 1522 61 3.22 Nicholas Hausmann: A Report Concerning the Zwickau Prophets (1521) 62 3.23 Melanchthon: Report to Frederick on the Situation in Wittenberg (1521) 62 3.24 Luther: Letter to Elector Frederick (1522) 63 3.25 Luther: The Invocavit Sermons (1522) 64 3.26 Luther: Against the Heavenly Prophets (1525) 65 3.27 Karlstadt: Several Main Points of Christian Teaching Regarding Which Dr. Luther Brings Andreas Carlstadt Under Suspicion Through False Accusation and Slander (1525) 66 4 Social Welfare and Education 68 4.1 Canon Law 69 4.2 Johann Geiler of Kaysersberg: Concerning Begging 69 4.3 The Nuremberg Begging Order of 1478 70 4.4 Luther: Foreword to Mathias Hutlin s The Book of Vagabonds (1510) 71 4.5 Luther: The Blessed Sacrament of the Holy and True Body of Christ and the Brotherhoods (1519) 72 4.6 Anonymous: What is Loan-Interest Other than Usury? (1522) 73 4.7 Luther: Trade and Usury (1524) 74 4.8 Luther: That Clergy Should Preach Against Usury (1540) 75 4.9 Social Welfare Legislation: The City of Wittenberg (1522) 76 4.10 Social Welfare Legislation: Leisnig (1523) 77 4.11 A Conversation Concerning the Common Chest of Schwabach, Namely by Brother Heinrich, Knecht Ruprecht, Spitler, and Their Master of the Wool Trade (1524) 78 4.12 Luther: To the Councilmen of All Cities in Germany that They Establish and Maintain Christian Schools (1524) 79 4.13 Luther: A Sermon on Keeping Children in School (1530) 80 4.14 Luther: The Small Catechism (1529) 81 4.15 Luther: The Large Catechism (1529) 82 5 The Reformation of the Common Man 85 5.1 Muntzer to Luther (1520) 86 5.2 Muntzer: Prague Manifesto (1521) 86 5.3 Muntzer to Melanchthon (1522) 87 5.4 Karlstadt: Whether One Should Proceed Slowly (1524) 87 5.5 Luther: Letter to the Christians at Strassburg in Opposition to the Fanatic Spirit (1524) 88 5.6 Luther: Letter to the Princes of Saxony Concerning the Rebellious Spirit (1524) 89 5.7 Muntzer to the People of Erfurt (1525) 90 5.8 Muntzer to Frederick the Wise (1524) 90 5.9 Muntzer: Vindication and Refutation (1524) 91 5.10 Muntzer: Sermon to the Princes (1524) 92 5.11 The Twelve Articles of the Upper Swabian Peasants (1525) 92 5.12 Luther: Admonition to Peace. A Reply to the Twelve Articles of the Peasants in Swabia (1525) 94 5.13 Aspects of Muntzer s Military Campaign 95 5.14 The Massacre of Weinsberg (April 16, 1525): Report of the Parson Johann Herolt 96 5.15 Muntzer to the People of Allstedt (1525) 96 5.16 Muntzer s Revolutionary Ring of Justice in the Camp of the Frankenhausen Army 97 5.17 Luther: Against the Robbing and Murdering Hordes of Peasants (1525) 97 5.18 Luther: An Open Letter on the Harsh Book Against the Peasants (1525) 98 5.19 The Account of Hans Hut (1527) 99 5.20 Johann Ruhl, Mansfeld Councillor, to Martin Luther (1525) 99 5.21 Aftermath of the Peasants War: Report of the Bernese Chronicler, Valerius Anshelm 100 5.22 The Consequences of Luther s Stance during the Peasants War: Hermann Muhlpfort, Mayor of Zwickau, to Stephan Roth at Wittenberg (1525) 100 6 The Swiss Connection: Zwingli and the Reformation in Zurich 102 6.1 Zwingli s Invitation to Zurich (1518) 103 6.2 Mandate of the Zurich Mayor and Council for Scriptural Preaching (1520) 104 6.3 Heinrich Bullinger: Account of Zwingli s Preaching Against Mercenary Service in 1521 104 6.4 The Affair of the Sausages 104 6.5 Christopher Froschauer s Defense (1522) 105 6.6 Zwingli: Concerning Choice and Liberty Respecting Food Concerning Offense and Vexation Whether Anyone Has Power to Forbid Foods at Certain Times Opinion of Huldreich Zwingli (1522) 105 6.7 Petition of Certain Preachers of Switzerland to the Most Reverend Lord Hugo, Bishop of Constance, That He Will Not Suffer Himself to be Persuaded to Make Any Proclamation to the Injury of the Gospel, Nor Endure Longer the Scandal of Harlotry, But Allow the Priests to Marry Wives or at Least Would Wink at Their Marriages (1522) 106 6.8 Ordinance for Reform of the Great Minster (1523) 106 6.9 Institution of the Prophesy in Zurich 107 6.10 Zwingli: Short Christian Instruction (1523) 108 6.11 Removal of Relics and Organs (1524) 109 6.12 The Council s Mandate for Church-Going (1531) 109 6.13 Zwingli s View of Luther 109 6.14 Zwingli: Of the Clarity and Certainty of the Word of God (1522) 110 6.15 Zwingli: The Sixty-Seven Articles (1523) 111 6.16 The First Zurich Disputation (January 23, 1523) 112 6.17 The Fourth Lateran Council (1215) 113 6.18 The Second Council of Lyons (1274) 113 6.19 Karlstadt: Dialogue on the Lord s Supper (1524) 113 6.20 Zwingli: Letter to Matthew Alber Concerning the Lord s Supper (1524) 115 6.21 Zwingli: Friendly Exegesis, That Is, Exposition of the Matter of the Eucharist, Addressed to Martin Luther by Huldrych Zwingli (1527) 116 6.22 Luther: Confession Concerning Christ s Supper (1528) 116 6.23 The Marburg Colloquy and Articles (1529) 117 6.24 Erasmus to Martin Bucer (1527) 118 6.25 Willibald Pirckheimer: Humanist Disappointment with the Reformation (1530) 119 7 The Radical Reformations 120 7.1 Zwingli: Refutation of the Tricks of the Baptists (1527) 121 7.2 Anabaptism Begins (1525) 122 7.3 The Second Zurich Disputation (1523) 123 7.4 Conrad Grebel and Companions to Muntzer (1524) 123 7.5 Mantz s Petition of Defense, Zurich (1524) 124 7.6 Hubmaier to Oecolampadius on Baptism (1525) 125 7.7 The Zurich Council Orders Infant Baptism, and Silence (1525) 125 7.8 The Council Orders Anabaptists to Be Drowned (1526) 125 7.9 Zwingli: Of Baptism (1525) 126 7.10 The Schleitheim Confession of Faith [Seven Articles] (1527) 127 7.11 The Banishment of Blaurock and Execution of Mantz 128 7.12 The Trial and Martyrdom of Michael Sattler (1527) 128 7.13 Johann Eck: Letter to Duke George of Saxony on the Anabaptists (1527) 130 7.14 Bernard Rothmann: A Confession of Faith and Life in the Church of Christ of Munster (1534) 131 7.15 The Twelve Elders of Munster: Thirteen Statements of the Order of Life and A Code for Public Behavior (mid-1534) 131 7.16 Appeal to Outsiders to Join the New Jerusalem in Munster 132 7.17 The Death of the Prophet Jan Matthijs 133 7.18 Communism in the City of Munster 133 7.19 The Introduction of Polygamy in the City of Munster 134 7.20 Rothmann: A Restitution of Christian Teaching, Faith, and Life (1534) 134 7.21 Rothmann: Concerning Revenge (1534) 135 7.22 The Capture, Torture, Confession, and Execution of Jan van Leiden 136 8 Augsburg 1530 to Augsburg 1555: Reform and Politics 137 8.1 Reform Programme of the Bishop of Pomerania (1525) 138 8.2 The Speech from the Throne (1526) 139 8.3 The Declaration of the Cities (1526) 139 8.4 The Recess of the Diet (1526) 140 8.5 The Speech from the Throne (1529) 140 8.6 The Resolution of the Majority (1529) 141 8.7 The Resolution of the Minority (1529) 141 8.8 Cardinal Campeggio s Instructions to the Emperor (1530) 142 8.9 Dukes William IV and Louis X of Bavaria to the Theological Faculty of Ingolstadt University (1530) 143 8.10 Johannes Eck: 404 Articles on the Errors of the Reformers (1530) 143 8.11 The Advice of Dr. Bruck, Chancellor of Electoral Saxony (1530) 144 8.12 The Augsburg Confession (1530) 144 8.13 Cardinal Legate Campeggio s Response to the Augsburg Confession (1530) 145 8.14 Confutation of the Augsburg Confession (1530) 146 8.15 The Recess of the Diet of Augsburg (1530) 147 8.16 Luther: Temporal Authority: To What Extent It Should Be Obeyed (1523) 147 8.17 Judgment of the Saxon Jurists (1530) 148 8.18 Luther: Letter to Lazarus Spengler in Nuremberg (1531) 148 8.19 Luther: Dr. Martin Luther s Warning to his Dear German People (1531) 149 8.20 Luther: Disputation Concerning the Right to Resist the Emperor (1539) 150 8.21 Nicholas Gallus et al.: A Confession of the Magdeburg Pastors Concerning Resistance to the Superior Magistrate (1550) 150 8.22 Sastrow s account of preaching during the Interim 151 8.23 The Peace of Augsburg (1555) 152 8.24 Charles V: Abdication Speech, Brussels (1556) 153 9 The Genevan Reformation 154 9.1 John Calvin: Conversion and Development 155 9.2 Nicolas Cop: Rector s Address to the University of Paris (1533) 156 9.3 Apology of John Calvin to the Gentlemen, the Nicodemites (1544) 157 9.4 Calvin: A Very Useful Account concerning the Great Benefit that Christianity will Receive if it takes an inventory of all the sacred bodies and relics which are in Italy, France, Germany, Spain, and other kingdoms and countries (1543) 158 9.5 Michel Roset: Chronicles of Geneva (1562) 159 9.6 Jeanne de Jussie: The Short Chronicle. A Poor Clare s Account of the Reformation in Geneva 160 9.7 The Ecclesiastical Ordinances of 1541 162 9.8 Calvin to Kaspar Olevianus regarding the churches in Heidelberg (1560) 163 9.9 Francois de Bonivard: On the Ecclesiastical Polity of Geneva 164 9.10 Calvin: Institutes of the Christian Religion 165 9.11 Calvin: The Geneva Catechism (1545) 168 9.12 Ordinances Concerning Church Polity in Geneva (1546) 169 9.13 Calvin: Short Treatise on the Holy Supper of our Lord Jesus Christ (1542) 170 9.14 Calvin on Luther: Letter to Heinrich Bullinger (1544) 171 9.15 The Consensus Tigurinus (1549) 171 9.16 A Letter from the Geneva Company of Pastors to the Swiss Churches on Jerome Bolsec (1551) 173 9.17 Calvin: The Consent Of The Pastors Of The Church Of Christ At Geneva, Concerning The Eternal Predestination Of God, By Which He Has Chosen Some Men Unto Salvation, While He Has Left Others To Their Own Destruction ... 173 9.18 Servetus: Letter to Abel Poupin, Minister in Geneva (1547?) 174 9.19 The Trial of Michael Servetus (1553) 174 9.20 Servetus: Plea for Religious Liberty 175 9.21 Servetus: Petition from Prison to the Geneva Council 175 9.22 The Sentence of the Geneva Council (1553) 175 9.23 Castellio: Concerning Heretics 176 10 The Reformation in France 178 10.1 Jacques Lefevre: Commentary on the Epistles of St. Paul (1512) 179 10.2 Lefevre: Preface to Latin Commentary on the Gospels (1522) 179 10.3 Lefevre: Letters to Farel (1524) 179 10.4 The Sorbonne Condemnation of Lefevre s Fifty-Two Sundays (1525) 180 10.5 Florimond de Raemond: Heresy at Meaux 180 10.6 Marie Dentiere: Epistle to Marguerite de Navarre (1539) 181 10.7 The Message of the Placards 182 10.8 Letter to Geneva from Five Evangelical Students Imprisoned in Lyon (1552) 182 10.9 Nicolas des Gallars, Pastor in Paris, to His Genevan Colleagues (1557) 183 10.10 Calvin s Response to Des Gallars (1557) 183 10.11 Letter from the Company of Pastors to the Church in Paris (1557) 184 10.12 The French Confession of Faith (1559) 185 10.13 The Report of the Venetian Ambassador in France (1561) 186 10.14 Michel de L Hopital: Speech to the Estates-General of Orleans (1560) 187 10.15 Beza s Account of the Colloquy of Poissy (1561) 188 10.16 St. Bartholomew s Eve (From Amsterdam, August 30, 1572) 189 10.17 The Duke of Sully s Account of the St. Bartholomew s Day Massacre 189 10.18 The Murder of Henry, Third Duke of Guise, at Blois (1588) 190 10.19 Report of the Assassination of Henry III (1589) 191 10.20 Henry IV Ascends the Throne (1589) 192 10.21 Henry IV Becomes a Catholic (1593) 192 10.22 The Pope s Pardon for Henry IV (1595) 192 10.23 The Edict of Nantes (1598) 193 11 The Reformation in the Netherlands 195 11.1 The Venetian Ambassador on Philip II (1559) 196 11.2 Philip II: The Edict of 1555 196 11.3 The Belgic Confession of Faith (1561) 197 11.4 Pieter Titelmans, Inquisitor to Regent Margaret of Parma Kortrijk (1562) 198 11.5 Description of Hedge-Preaching Given to Regent Margaret (1566) 199 11.6 Philip Marnix on Mob Violence in the Netherlands (1567) 199 11.7 Request of the Nobles, Presented to Regent Margaret by Henry Brederode (1566) 200 11.8 The Request of Those of the New Religion to the Confederate Nobles (1567) 201 11.9 Philip II: Letter to Pope Pius V on the Religious Question in the Netherlands (1566) 201 11.10 The Goals of William of Orange (1572) 202 11.11 Calvinists Appeal to the King for a Truce (1578) 202 11.12 Beutterich on the Possible Consequences of a Truce (1578) 203 11.13 Act of Abjuration (1581) 203 11.14 Philip II Refuses to Concede Toleration (1585) 204 12 The Reformations in England and Scotland 205 12.1 William Melton, Chancellor of York Minster: Sermon to Ordinands (c.1510) 206 12.2 Simon Fish: A Supplication for the Beggars (1529) 207 12.3 John Foxe s Acts and Monuments: Lollardy on the Eve of the Reformation 207 12.4 John Foxe on Robert Barnes 208 12.5 Edward Hall: A Protestant Merchant Outwits a Bishop (1529) 208 12.6 A Report of Henry VIII by the Venetian Ambassador (1519) 209 12.7 The Act of Supremacy (1534) 210 12.8 The Act of the Six Articles (1539) 210 12.9 Anne Askew: The Examinations (1545, 1546) 211 12.10 Tyndale s Preface to the New Testament (1526) 211 12.11 Thomas Cranmer s Preface to the Great Bible (1540) 212 12.12 The Preface to the Geneva Bible (1560) 212 12.13 The Preface to the Rheims New Testament (1582) 212 12.14 The Preface to the Authorized (King James) Version of the Bible (1611) 213 12.15 Thomas Cranmer: Certain Sermons, or Homilies (1547) 213 12.16 The Act of Uniformity (1549) 214 12.17 Act to Take Away All Positive Laws Against Marriage of Priests (1549) 214 12.18 The Marian Injunctions (1554) 215 12.19 The Act of Supremacy (1559) 215 12.20 The Elizabethan Injunctions (1559) 216 12.21 John Jewel: An Apologie of the Church of England (1560/61) 217 12.22 The Thirty-Nine Articles of the Church of England (1571) 218 12.23 John Hooper: The Regulative Principle and Things Indifferent (1550) 219 12.24 John a Lasco: The Abolition of Vestments (1552?) 220 12.25 The Excommunication and Deposition of Elizabeth: Pope Pius V s Bull Regnans in Excelsis (1570) 221 12.26 Eyewitness Account of the Execution of Mary Stuart on the 18th Day of February of the New Calendar, in the Castle of Fotheringhay in England (1587) 222 13 Catholic Renewal and Counter-Reformation 224 13.1 Girolamo Savonarola: On the Renovation of the Church (1495) 225 13.2 John Colet: Convocation Sermon (1512) 226 13.3 Egidio da Viterbo: Address to the Fifth Lateran Council (1512) 227 13.4 Gasparo Contarini s Conversion Experience (1511) 228 13.5 Contarini on Justification (1523) 228 13.6 Pope Adrian VI: Instruction to the Diet of Nuremberg (1522) 229 13.7 Proposal of a Select Committee of Cardinals and other Prelates Concerning the Reform of the Church, Written and Presented by Order of His Holiness Pope Paul III (1537) 230 13.8 Anonymous: The Beneficio di Christo (1543) 231 13.9 Morata: Letter to Lavinia della Rovere Orsini (1551/52) 232 13.10 Morata: Letter to Matthias Flacius Illyricus (1553) 232 13.11 Morata to Pietro Paolo Vergerio (1555) 233 13.12 Henry Cornelius Agrippa: The Art of the Inquisitors (1530) 233 13.13 Loyola s Conversion 234 13.14 Pope Paul III: Regimini Militantis Ecclesiae (1540) 234 13.15 Loyola: Rules for Thinking with the Church 235 13.16 Loyola: Letter to Father Peter Canisius on Opposing Heresy (1554) 236 13.17 The Council of Trent on the Canonical Scriptures (1546) 236 13.18 Decree and Canons Concerning Justification (1547) 237 13.19 Canons on the Sacraments in General, Seventh Session (1547) 238 13.20 Decree Concerning the Eucharist (1551) 238 13.21 Antonius Caucus: Sermon for the Opening of Session Eighteen (1562) 239 13.22 The Sacrifice of the Mass, Twenty-Second Session (1562) 240 13.23 Ten Rules Concerning Prohibited Books Drawn Up By The Fathers Chosen By the Council of Trent and Approved by Pope Pius IV 240 13.24 Juan de Mariana, SJ: Whether It Is Right to Destroy a Tyrant? (1599) 241 13.25 Juan Gines de Sepulveda: On the Indians (c.1547) 242 13.26 Bartolome de las Casas: On the Indians (1552) 242 Bibliography 244 Acknowledgments to Sources 250 Index 271
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About Carter Lindberg

Carter Lindberg is Professor Emeritus of Church History at Boston University. His numerous publications include The European Reformations, 2nd edition (2009), Love: A Brief History through Western Christianity (2008), and A Brief History of Christianity (2005), The Pietist Theologians (2004) all published by Wiley-Blackwell.
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