The Ethno-Geography of the Pomo and Neighboring Indians Volume 6

The Ethno-Geography of the Pomo and Neighboring Indians Volume 6

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1908 edition. Excerpt: ...and about a mile south-southwest of the present yo'kaia rancheria. The location given on the accompanying map is on the north bank of this creek, and on the Horst Brothers ranch, but according to other informants there was still another site on the south bank of the creek and about a quarter of a mile up stream. After the coming of the whites this site was occupied permanently for a short time by at least a few Indians. tcaco'l, at a point just south of the confluence of Robertson creek with Russian river. This site is located just east of the railroad track on the Isaac Burk ranch and nearly due east of the ranch house. co'dono, from co, east, and dono' or dano', mountain, at a point about a mile east of Russian river and about four miles southeast of Ukiah. This site is located at the foot of a rocky peak about a mile south of Mill creek. kawi'aka, at a point about a quarter of a mile west of Russian river and about three miles south of Ukiah. This site is located on the first bench of land up from the river bottom and is just west of a small slough which runs through the Cox and Dutton ranches. Before the coming of white settlers to this region the river itself ran in this slough, which is at a distance of about a quarter of a mile west of the present course of the river. The ranch house on the Cox ranch is situated on this site. camo'ka, near the south bank of Robertson creek at a point about three and a half miles up stream from Russian river. This camp seems to have been but little used and only an approximate location could be obtained for it. tne'una, from tci'eii, said to signify the highest point on a stream to which large fish, such as salmon, can ascend, and una', or wina' on top of, at or near the ranch house on the Lucas...show more

Product details

  • Paperback
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 209g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236570979
  • 9781236570970