The Ethical Philosophy of Samuel Clarke; Inaugural Dissertation Presented to the University of Leipzig for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy

The Ethical Philosophy of Samuel Clarke; Inaugural Dissertation Presented to the University of Leipzig for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1892 edition. Excerpt: ...valid for all mankind, it would be necessary to show that all men have the same experience. This proof Clarke has not given, and the partial proofs he has adduced are, as we have seen, very inadequate. Unless, then, we find in his treatment of moral perception some further support for the statement that moral fitness is just as evident as mathematical proportion, we must conclude it to be nothing but an assertion, lacking sufficient proof, and yet, perhaps, a supposition necessary to the construction of his ethical theory. But as hypotheses are founded upon a basis of probability and are confirmed by their application to the facts of experience, there remains the possibility that Clarke's assertion will be justified by the logical coherence and practical value of his entire ethical theory. IV. Moral Perception. According to Clarke, there are in the universe two great entities, God and Nature, the Creator and his Creation. Nature includes not only inanimate things, but living conscious souls, the souls of men. Inanimate things, together with plants and the lower animals, are what Clarke calls things natural in the narrower sense. With these directly, moral philosophy has nothing to do. What is left, then, in Nature, to be the subject of ethical enpuiry? Only persons, souls, thinking beings. Nature, in this widest sense, includes both God and men. It is in the nature of things, that is, in the nature of God and man, that moral distinctions are founded. The eternal fitness of things, is a fitness of relations between individual souls. The individual soul stands to the rest of nature in the relation of subject and object, the perceiving mind and the things perceived. The universe is reasonable, or rather it was originally so, because God is...show more

Product details

  • Paperback
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 82g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236969707
  • 9781236969705