Essentials of Milk Hygiene; A Practical Treatise on Dairy and Milk Inspection and on the Hygienic Production and Handling of Milk, for Students of Dairying and Sanitarians

Essentials of Milk Hygiene; A Practical Treatise on Dairy and Milk Inspection and on the Hygienic Production and Handling of Milk, for Students of Dairying and Sanitarians

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1907 edition. Excerpt: ... subjected to a sufficient degree of heat to kill with certainty all of the pathogenic micro-organisms that are present. The pathogenic bacteria that are of importance in this connection are the germs of tuberculosis, typhoid fever, diphtheria, cholera and pest and pyogenic cocci and the virus of foot-and-mouth disease. These have been shown by recent investigations to be killed by momentary heating to 70 to 80 C. (158 to 176 F.) and they die at a temperature of 65 C. (150 F.), if this degree of heat is maintained long enough. This is also true of many bacteria occurring in milk which may be injurious, yet which cause no specific disease. Therefore, milk may be pasteurized either by a brief heating at a higher temperature or a longer heating at a lower temperature. But the spores of bacteria and the thermo-philic forms that are specially capable of resisting heat, are not destroyed by these methods, so pasteurization does not have the same effect as sterilization. Milk may be pasteurized in different ways. The following three methods are those most commonly used: 2. The milk is heated during one-quarter to one hour at from 80 to 85 (176 to 185 F.) while it is flowing through an appropriate pasteurizing apparatus; then it is cooled immediately. 2. The milk is heated from one quarter to one hour at about 65 C. (150 F.) in a tank or vat. The milk flows directly from this vessel into the one in which it is to be sold, or it is first passed through a cooler. 3. The milk is poured into well cleansed or sterilized bottles or metal vessels, is then heated for a considerable time at 65 to 80 C. (150 to 176 F.), then the bottles or vessels are sealed and quickly cooled. For sanitary reasons the last of these methods is unquestionably to be preferred, but...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 72 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 145g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236664590
  • 9781236664594