Essays on Literature and Philosophy; Dante in His Relation to the Theology and Ethics of the Middle Ages. Goethe and Philosophy. Rousseau. Wordsworth. the Problem of Philosophy at the Present Time. the Genius of Carlyle Volume 1

Essays on Literature and Philosophy; Dante in His Relation to the Theology and Ethics of the Middle Ages. Goethe and Philosophy. Rousseau. Wordsworth. the Problem of Philosophy at the Present Time. the Genius of Carlyle Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1892 edition. Excerpt: ... their natural will, "the impulse of appetite, is slavery, and obedience to self-prescribed law alone is liberty." Thus, at a turn of the hand, the abstract individual passes into the abstract universal, and the anarchy of individual will changes into the despotism of the State. Starting with the idea of the natural independence of every individual, Eousseau ends with a social desp&-_ tism, in which every interest of life is regulated and controlled by the State. And when in the Umile this contradiction is forced upon his attention, Eousseau thinks it enough to tell us that we must choose between the natural man and the citizen, for we cannot have both; and that the defect of the present mode of education is that it is directed to two opposite ends, and therefore fails in attaining either, but only produces hommes doubles, who have neither the independence of the natural man, nor that absolute absorption in the moi commun of the State which characterised the citizens of ancient Eome or Sparta. Of any union of social and individual liberty which does not involve the suppression of one or the other, of any organic unity of society in which the freedom of the members shall be consistent with the unity of the body politic, Eousseau has no conception, and, just because of this, his theory fluctuates between one and the other. In the end he seems to despair of political life, and he seeks to educate his Emile independently of any society, or at least of any society beyond the family. The "sole natural education is the domestic education," and, when it is completed, the ideal pupil has learned to regard his civic duty as something' secondary and accidental, and not as the real object of his life. Though, therefore, Eousseau makes...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 54 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 113g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236543904
  • 9781236543905