An Essay on Laughter; Its Forms, Its Causes, Its Development and Its Value

An Essay on Laughter; Its Forms, Its Causes, Its Development and Its Value

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1902 edition. Excerpt: ... observer, this making of faces grows into a standing pastime towards the end of the second year.2 Is not the greeting of the baby-face in the mirror, which in Ruth's case occurred on the 221st day (eighth month), and in that of Preyer's boy at the end of the ninth month, a kind of accost of a newly discovered playmate? Perhaps the laughter of a little boy, of one and a half year, already referred to, at the jumping of a ping-pong ball and at a _ ceased to alarm and is taken as fun. 1 1 Ruth's laughter at the mother's face was certainly very early. 2 Hogan, op. c'lt., p. 71. RESPONSES TO MERRY SIGHTS 213 spring-blind going up or coming down with a run, expressed a recognition of something play-like. This co-operation of the play-inclination in the perception of the laughable in visual presentations is still more plainly illustrated in the effect of actions and postures. The quickness of the eye of mirth for expressions of the mood of romping play is seen in a child's laughter, already referred to, at the gambols of a horse or other animal. Ruth was much entertained on her 441st day by the antics of a. dog. Especially enlivening is the appearance of quick, play-like movements in grave elders addicted to decorous deportment. The girl M., at the age of eighteen months, broke into boisterous laughter on seeing her father as he ran to catch a train, with his handkerchief hanging out of his pocket. This sudden revelation of the playful temper may come to the child by way of postures and expressions. The awful laws of propriety soon tend to give the look of playful licence to certain bodily postures, especially that of lying down. The boy (3., when twenty months old, laughed heartily on seeing his sister lying on...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 132 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 249g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236967631
  • 9781236967633