An Essay on Labor; Its Union, --Its Proper Objects, --Its Natural Laws, --Its Just Rights, --Its Duties and Prospects. Addressed to Our Employers, Employed, and Parliamentary Representatives

An Essay on Labor; Its Union, --Its Proper Objects, --Its Natural Laws, --Its Just Rights, --Its Duties and Prospects. Addressed to Our Employers, Employed, and Parliamentary Representatives

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1877* edition. Excerpt: ...of" our present Physicians, Legal Judges, Lawyers, Theologians, and Politicians, are shallow, shadowy, worthless, compared with these sublime themes of the Educator. 289. Those who thoroughly comprehend the causes which have combined to produce, to determine the present state of things, find themselves possessed of the knowledge that gives the power, by which they may arrange and apply the causes, the means, which shall produce and determine the future condition of society, which may be deemed most desirable. If the constant dropping of water can penetrate the hardest rock--if the most sterile soils are capable, by generous culture, of being improved, and covered with flowers and with fruits;--if the most ferocious and furious animals may be gradually tamed by careful kindly training: --How can we suppose that man, so intelligent, so sensitive, that a gesture can command him, that an accent can persuade him, that a word can precipitate or stop his career, will resist the cultivation, the teaching, which will be found best suited to his peculiar nature? 290. Nothing is more common in present society than grievous mistakes as to the comparative importance of the different vocations of life. The most showy displays--the most noisy and declamatory pursuits--the most glittering professions--are too frequently called and considered the most important. Multitudes are blinded by artificial dignity--are dazzled by official splendor--are found gazing and wondering at certain puny pigmies, because they may happen to be perched up on some eminence, in some of the departments of the State. The proclaimers of superstitions suppositions--opposed to all known facts, contrary to all possibilities, to all human experience--who could electrify crowds of the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 180 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 10mm | 331g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236676920
  • 9781236676924