An Essay on Capacity and Genius; To Prove That There Is No Original Mental Superiority Between the Most Illiterate and the Most Learned of Mankind; And That No Genius ... Is Innate, But Solely Produced by and Dependent on Circumstances.

An Essay on Capacity and Genius; To Prove That There Is No Original Mental Superiority Between the Most Illiterate and the Most Learned of Mankind; And That No Genius ... Is Innate, But Solely Produced by and Dependent on Circumstances.

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1820* edition. Excerpt: ...player first, and finding his talent, or, as the innatists would say, his "genius" did not lay that way, retired to the closet with a natural determination to write, when he could not act. It is supposed that we have not his first dramatic essays; and, before he became generally celebrated, he must have consulted and studied the famous dramatic authors who preceded him.--He saw the difference between London manners and those of home, and of course, in his best pieces, he has given us circumstances supposed to have happened at his birth place.--None of his fables are invented; passages which we most admire, were copied from the mouths or examples of others j and he has followed history with astonishing minuteness. By the great character of superior nature There is extant an anecdote which shows plainly the manner in which Shakspeare procured many of his best scenes and ideas. It is a letter from a fellow of Christ-church College, and a member of a club which used to assemble at the Globe, in Blackfriars, to one Marie. "Friend Marie, --I must desyre that my syster hyr watche, and the cookerie book you promysed, may be sente bye the man. I never longed for thy company more than last night: we were all very merrye at the Globe, when Ned Alleyn did not scruple to affyrme pleasauntely to thy friende Will, that he had stolen his speeche about the qualityes of an actor's excellencye in Hamlet, hys Trajedye, from conversations manyfold whych had passed betweene them, and opinyons given by Alleyn touchinge the subjecte. Shakspeare did not take this talke in good sorte: but Jonson put an end to the strife with wittylye remarkinge, 'This affaire needeth no conteutione; you stole it from Ned, no doubte; do not marvel. Have you not seen...show more

Product details

  • Paperback
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 181g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236897374
  • 9781236897374