Essay on the Application of Abstract Reasoning to the Christina Doctrines; Originally Published as an Introduction to Edwards on the Will

Essay on the Application of Abstract Reasoning to the Christina Doctrines; Originally Published as an Introduction to Edwards on the Will

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1832 edition. Excerpt: ...plunge among the eddies of ignorance and folly. There he will find a liberty to follow the ten thousand paths of error, instead of the one path of truth; and there he may surrender himself to a course so capricious, so broken, and so tortuous, that his wanderings must defy the power of any intelligence short of the Supreme, to calculate their terminations. Nothing, one would think, ought to be wished for by any order of beings, but that its mechanism should be so constructed as to secure (in the ordinary course of things) its welfare. It is by such a well-ordered construction of parts and functions, that the preservation and reproduction of the animal tribes. are actually secured: their machinery, while it obeys the great laws of matter and mind, accomplishes the beneficent intention of the Creator; and each individual enjoys his hour of physical 'good. The well-being of man is in the same manner provided for, in the constitution of his more complex nature; and so long as all the parts of this constitution perform their functions, ' all is well. Damage and ruin arise from the inaction or decay of some of the parts. The actual ewistence of this damage is precisely that point of physical science at which it is intersected by theology, and where the former must ask light and aid fi'om the latter. For a moment, let it be inquired, what advantage a sentient and intelligent being could derive from an absolute emancipation from causation, or from the certain sequency of effects? The very notion of a real contingency, in this sense, is inadmissible in philosophy. But let it be granted as a thing conceivable. Ought not, then, this freedom from causation to be termed rather a necessity of the most dire and fortnidable sort? and he whose...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 46 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 100g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236871189
  • 9781236871183