An Essay Upon Political Oeconomy; Being an Inquiry Into the Truth of the Two Positions of the French Oeconomists That Labour Employed in Manufactures Is Unproductive, and That All Taxes Ultimately Fall Upon, or Settle in the Surplus

An Essay Upon Political Oeconomy; Being an Inquiry Into the Truth of the Two Positions of the French Oeconomists That Labour Employed in Manufactures Is Unproductive, and That All Taxes Ultimately Fall Upon, or Settle in the Surplus

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1804 edition. Excerpt: ...laying it di'f rectly where it will at last settle, or by letting it come to " him by sinking of his rents, which when once they are " fallen, every one knows are not easily raised again, let him " consider." To support this conclusion Mr. Locke supposes, pages 56 and 57; " in the present state of affairs in " Encland, (1691) that the rents of England are " twelve millions, and that the charge and necessities of " Government require a supply of three millions"--" that to " slvift off the burthen from the land, some country gen" tleraen mould think fit to raise these three millions upon " commodities, --it is evident," he concludes, " that, to do " this out of commodities, they must, to the Consumer, be 45. The duties upon malt and beer have of late years been very much advanced, " be raised a quarter In their price, so that every thing, to " him that uses it, must be a quarter dearer." At this period (1688) Mr. Gregory King, to the accuracy and extent of whose researches into subjects of this nature, every Political Arithmetician acknowledges himself indebted, Harleian MS. No. 1898, folio 14; computed the national income of England at 43,505,800/., which makes the national rents about tivosevenths of the publick income. Mr. Locke seems to conclude, that nothing but the surplus produce or rent of land is brought to market, or included in the commodities bought and sold in the kingdom, whereas the sum of commodities being five sevenths more than the rents of the kingdom, their price would only be raised ttvo twenty-ninths, aNd the Landlord pay but eight hundred and twenty fix thousand pounds instead of three millions, to which they would certainly have been subject, had the tax been laid directly upon land; for it is soundly observed, page...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 24 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 1mm | 64g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236656253
  • 9781236656254